Microsoft posts videos of users who liked Vista after thinking it was new OS

Update ribbon (small)

9:00am ET July 29, 2008 - The videos are now live on the Mojave Experiment Web site.


Microsoft has posted actual videos from its "Mojave Experiment," an effort to dispel negative stereotypes about Vista by making Windows users think they were running a newer operating system that was actually Vista.

While not referring to Mojave by name, Microsoft first talked about the project publicly during a meeting with financial analysts last week, when Bill Veghte, a senior VP, mentioned an experiment done by Microsoft among PC users who "have a negative perception relative to" Vista.

"They're not using it, but they are predisposed to think about it in a negative way," according to Veghte, who heads up Microsoft's Online Services & Windows Business Group.

Veghte said the subjects in the experiment consisted of a focus group chosen through a phone survey based on random dialing. He then rolled video showing how users who'd voiced anti-Vista leanings in the survey -- but were then duped into thinking they were looking at a new OS codenamed Mojave -- liked what they saw, even though they were actually viewing Vista.

In practically the same breath, Veghte mentioned another survey done by Microsoft, this one conducted among existing Vista users. "We have 89 percent satisfied or very satisfied, and 83 percent of those customers would recommend it to friends, family, et cetera. That is a very good result when you compare and contrast the satisfaction levels on other products," he contended at the meeting.

When early reports about Mojave emerged online late last week, BetaNews contacted Microsoft to find out more about the two surveys discussed at the analyst meeting, and whether their relationship -- if any -- to one another.

As it turns out, Mojave and Microsoft's "Vista satisfaction" survey are not related -- not directly, anyway.

"The source of the [Vista satisfaction] survey was Penn Schoen and Berland Associates, which is a different company than Microsoft is working with on Mojave," a Microsoft spokesperson told BetaNews today.

Mojave, on the other hand, was aimed at getting a better understanding of "the reactions of customers to Windows Vista, when they were not aware that they were using Windows Vista," she said.

"The people we tested were were a collection of Mac, Linux, and Windows users who have not made the switch yet to Windows Vista," BetaNews was told. "We look forward to showing them on July 29."

BetaNews asked Microsoft whether the Mojave videos will be released in Microsoft ads. "We intend to use these videos as part of some upcoming Windows Vista marketing treatments. You can expect to continue to see ongoing product marketing efforts around Windows that communicates its value to our customers," the spokesperson maintained.

Early Monday evening, prior to the posting of the anticipated Mojave videos, a teaser site established over the past few days spilled a few other details about Mojave.

The Mojave Experiment took place over "three days in San Francisco, July, 2008," according to postings on the site.

"Subjects get a live 10-minute demo of "'the next Microsoft operating system - codenamed Mojave - but it's actually Windows Vista," the teaser site proclaimed.

More than 120 computer users viewed the "Mojave" demo, presented on an HP Pavilion DV 2000 with 2GB of RAM.

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