Latest Technology News

Think Privacy CEO launches site to name publishers who illegally detect and circumvent adblockers

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Adblockers are, have been, and will continue to be a matter of some controversy. While sites rely on ad income to stay afloat, users are understandably irked by a barrage of flashy commercials and are increasingly turning to adblocking. To fight back, some sites are using various methods to detect the presence of an adblocker and then bypassing it.

This, in turn, upsets people once again, and the CEO of privacy and security consortium Think Privacy, Alexander Hanff, has come up with a solution. To fight back he has set up a website that names and shames those sites that "use illegal methods to detect that you are using an adblocker".

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Logitech announces C925e Webcam for meetings, vlogging, and live-streaming

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When webcams first came to prominence, they were a grainy mess. Still, having the ability to video chat with another person over the internet was cool as heck. Nowadays, such cameras are used for even more things, such as business meetings, vlogging, and live-streaming over services like Twitch and Stream.me.

While many laptops and monitors have webcams integrated into them, they aren't always the best quality (ahem, Apple's brand-new MacBook with obsolete 480p quality). Luckily, third-party USB variants exist. One of the more popular manufacturers of these cams is Logitech. Today, that company announces its newest such model, the C925e, which is compatible with Windows, Mac, and Linux.

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Monitor and record webcams and IP cameras with ImWatcher

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ImWatcher is a free Windows application for monitoring and recording webcams. The program is simple, straightforward and easy to use, but it also has one or two more advanced features that we really weren’t expecting.

The good news starts on launch, when you can point the program at any connected webcams, IP cameras, as many as you have.

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Oukitel K4000 Pro -- a smartphone for a life of hard knocks [Review]

Oukitel K4000 Pro

At the top end of the smartphone market the likes of Apple and Samsung are competing to offer the latest technology. But down at the lower priced end of things, for people who want a smartphone on a budget, there are a swathe of Chinese makers competing for your cash.

Set aside your techno-snobbery and many of these phones turn out to be surprisingly good for the price. The latest to come our way is the Oukitel K4000 Pro. It's a 64-bit, quad-core, 4G phone with a five-inch screen, running last-but-one Android 5.1 Lollipop and costing less that $150. Its key selling point though is that it's designed to be tough. On paper the spec looks impressive but how does it stack up in the real world?

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New service helps small businesses sync and share files

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Enterprises of all sizes have become increasingly reliant on file syncing and sharing services. But for smaller companies business focused services can be expensive, leaving them reliant on free consumer services that offer limited space and functions.

Backup and storage specialist Datto is launching a new inexpensive yet powerful file sync and share (FSS) service leveraging the low cost basis of the company's 200 petabyte (PB) private cloud, coupled with a global license agreement with ownCloud, an established open-source leader in the FSS industry.

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How to change your MAC address in Windows 10

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Every network adapter has a MAC address, a unique value used to identify devices at the physical network layer. Normally this address stays the same forever, which may allow networks to recognize and track you.

This isn’t always a bad thing -- a network could use a MAC address to allow device access without authentication -- but if you’re concerned, most MAC addresses can be changed in a few seconds. Windows 10 comes with MAC randomization built in. Click the network icon in your taskbar, then select Network Settings to begin.

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Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto revealed to be Australian entrepreneur Craig Wright

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For some time, the person who created the cryptocurrency Bitcoin has been known as Satoshi Nakamoto. We know that was nothing more than a pseudonym, and now Australian entrepreneur Craig Wright has revealed that he is the man behind the mask.

It brings to an end years of speculation about the inventor's real identity, and Wright has been able to provide technical proof to the BBC to back up his claims. The IT and security consultant's home was raided in recent days as part of an investigation by the Australian Tax Office, and documents leaked from the inquiries pointed towards Wright. He has now confirmed his identity.

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Facebook Messenger to gain privacy-enhancing self-destructing messages

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With the ongoing debate about privacy and encryption, the rollout of end-to-end encryption to Facebook-owned WhatsApp came as little surprise. Now Facebook Messenger is set to gain a couple of privacy-enhancing features including self-destructing messages.

Already found in other messaging tools such as SnapChat and Telegram, self-destructing messages have been unearthed in Messenger for iOS version 68.0. As you would expect, the feature makes it possible to place a time limit on how long messages are visible for, making it ideal for communicating sensitive information.

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Got home repairs? DIY is free this month on Sling TV

DIY

When things go wrong in your home, and they seem to do so at an alarming rate sometimes, then you can hire a repairman and suffer the charges for labor, or you can learn to fix it yourself for the cost of parts and your own sweat.

The question is, how do you learn these things? Well, the obvious answer is the internet, but that isn't always as hands-on as you may need. It helps to really see things being done, as opposed to following what amounts to a user manual.

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Windows 10 growth slows as OS X makes market share gains

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The growth of Windows 10 continues, albeit slowly, the latest figures from NetMarketShare show. The statistics for April reveal that, at long last, Windows 7 is no longer installed on the majority of computers, slipping to a 48.79 percent market share. Windows 10 saw slight growth to 14.35 percent (up from 14.15 percent), and Windows XP dropped below 9.66 percent.

Usage of Windows 8.x stayed largely stable (12.11 percent compared to 12.01 percent in March), but the balance between Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 (9.16 percent down from 9.56 percent) shifted slightly, with the older version seeing slight growth (2.95 percent, up from 2.45 percent). OS X's market share increased slightly, and Linux dropped a little.

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Fitbit's Aria internet-connected scale can be hacked

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These days more and more items around our homes are connected to the internet. In theory, this sounds like a great idea, and it can be -- providing it is implemented correctly, meaning in a secure way. In practice, however, that isn't always the case. We've seen endless stories of what can go wrong, even Barbie dolls turned bad.

Scales are probably one of the last things you'd expect to be connected. Actually, though, that innovation came several years ago with a scale that tweeted your weight -- a great way of shaming you into continuing that diet and exercise program.

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Searching for a nanotech self-organizing principle

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One of the frustrations of nanotechnology is that we generally can’t make nano materials in large quantities or at low cost, much less both. For the last five years a friend of mine has been telling me this story, explaining that there’s a secret manufacturing method and that he’s seen it. I’m beginning to think the guy is right. We may finally be on the threshold of the real nanotech revolution.

Say you want to build a space elevator, which is probably the easiest way to hoist payloads into orbit. Easy yet also impossible, because no material can be manufactured that is strong enough to make an elevator cable to space. The weight of the cable alone would cause too much tensile stress: it couldn’t carry itself, much less a commercially-viable payload, too. Some exotic new material is required, one with a strength-to-weight ratio beyond any present material, even spider silk. So we talk about space elevators, we have conferences about space elevators, we draw picture after picture of space elevators, yet we can’t make one. Or couldn’t… until now.

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SanDisk unveils 2.5-inch SATA Z410 SSD

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Solid state drives are quite mature and ubiquitous nowadays -- the technology is no longer cutting edge. While some computers still ship with slow mechanical hard disk drives, SSDs are now largely the default option.

SATA based drives are slow compared to newer NVMe PCIe variants, but still more than fast enough for most consumers. These 2.5-inch SATA drives are often less expensive too, making them a wise option for OEMs looking to build low or medium-cost laptops. Now, SanDisk announces the Z410 -- a drop-in solution for manufacturers, featuring a capacity of up to 480GB.

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Adopt a dog or cat, get a free Logi Circle Home Security Camera

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The month of May is National Pet Month. As an animal lover, it is very important to me. It breaks my heart to think of unloved cats and dogs in shelters. Whenever that ASPCA commercial comes on TV -- the one with the Sarah McLachlan music -- I have to change the channel; it can literally make me cry.

If you are thinking of getting a pet, I urge you to go to a shelter, as it can save the animal's life. Logitech is upping the ante, however, as it is giving away free Logi Circle Home Security Cameras to those that adopt either a cat or dog from two specific places in May. Does a free home surveillance camera make you more likely to adopt a pet?

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Facebook hit with lawsuit over new stock option that gives Zuckerberg a license to print money

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When Facebook announced its first quarter results this week, it also announced that it created a new class of stock. The non-voting Class C stock proposed would enable Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan to more easily fund their philanthropic ventures, whilst keeping Zuckerberg himself firmly in control of Facebook.

In response to this, a lawsuit has been raised that says the proposed deal is unfair. The shareholders raising the class action lawsuit said the deal would grant Zuckerberg even more control and that the board committee didn’t do enough "to obtain anything of meaningful value" in return. The lawsuit accuses him of wanting "to retain this power, while selling off large amounts of his stockholdings, and reaping billions of dollars in proceeds".

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