Linux Mint 19 named 'Tara'

Unfortunately, 2017 was not the much-fabled year of the Linux desktop. Hell, that might not ever happen. With Windows 10 being such a disappointment for many, however, it is definitely a possibility. Maybe 2018 will be the year...

One such desktop operating system that consistently delights users is Linux Mint. Today, we get some information about the upcoming version 19. The biggest news is that it will be called "Tara." If you aren’t aware, the operating system is always named after a woman.

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Clement Lefebvre, Linux Mint leader, shares the following information.

The first release in the upcoming Linux Mint 19.x series will be named "Tara".

Tara is a popular name here in Ireland, and the name of someone we really like 😉

The development cycle only just started so it’s a bit early to give details about Linux Mint 19, but here’s what we can say already:

  • Linux Mint 19 is estimated to be released around May/June 2018.
  • Linux Mint 19.x releases will be based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and supported until 2023.
  • Linux Mint 19.x will use GTK 3.22.

GTK 3.22 is a major stable release for GTK3. From there on, the theming engine and the APIs are stable. This is a great milestone for GTK3. It also means Linux Mint 19.x (which will become our main development platform) will use the same version of GTK as LMDE 3, and distributions which use components we develop, such as Fedora, Arch..etc. This should ease development and increase the quality of these components outside of Linux Mint.

What do you think of the name Tara? Tell me in the comments below.

Image credit: Africa Studio / Shutterstock

74 Responses to Linux Mint 19 named 'Tara'

  1. mcavity says:

    its been "the year of the Linux Desktop" evey year for the last 20 years.. I just don't think it will ever happen in my lifetime.

    • Future Bardock says:

      The only thing preventing Linux from becoming dominant on desktop is lack of apps and games available only on Windows, which btw can be overcome with VirtualBox and PlayOnLinux. There are also plenty of great alternative apps available on Linux.
      Apps and games developers can easily make "the year of the Linux desktop" happen if they port to Linux and package their apps and games as Flatpak and Snap for easy delivery to Linux, with Flatpak and Snap, their apps and games will work on any Linux distribution. It wouldn't matter how many Linux distributions there are.

      • Ordeith says:

        LOL. Keep the faith, Bardock. 🤣

      • Future Bardock says:

        Says the one who operates only on unshakable faith in MS.

      • Ordeith says:

        Is that ridiculous lie really the only thing you can ever come back with? LOL. 🤣

      • Order_66 says:

        I dunno, having an unshakable faith in a company that routinely ignores their customers as well as tricking them and even lying to them vs open source where most everything is done with best intentions for the end user...

      • Ordeith says:

        And who would that be? There are a few Google fans here, I suppose...

      • sn0wflake says:

        It's pretty hard to avoid Google. There are alternatives to Gmail and Android, but try avoiding YouTube. I could also use Bing but I actually prefer Google search. So I'm not sure what a Google fan is... maybe somebody who insists on buying Google hardware... I dunno.

      • PepsiGuy says:

        Typical response from a Linux 'Help Forum'

        How can I get my videos and photos to play with music?

        That question has been asked before, search for the answer.

        Well, I certainly would NEVER use a GUI to do something like that, a console is all you need.

        Can you provide DBUS logging and what is the sample rate off the fravistat?

      • Order_66 says:

        That's why I said "best intentions", getting help with Linux can usually begin with good intentions but often ends in Linux elitist douchebaggery.

        But it's much better than the Microsoft arrogance my way or the highway attitude, if you conform to their distorted direction then you get a lot of help and everything becomes easy, disagree with them and now you're the problem.

      • Future Bardock says:

        Videos: VLC, SMPlayer, MPV.
        Photos: Gimp, Krita, Builtin photo viewer.
        Music: Clementine, Rhythmbox, Audacious.
        Install them from Package Manager/Software Manager. No need to go to terminal console.

      • Future Bardock says:

        Isn't that your job?

      • Ordeith says:

        Ridiculous lies and faith without empirical data is your domain, Bardock. 🤣

      • Order_66 says:

        Those are potentially viable solutions however I'm watching PWA's evolve in hopes that they fulfill the goal of being just as feature complete, modern and powerful as win32 eventually, hopefully sooner than later.

        I think if they play out the way they're being presented then Microsoft will quickly lose huge amounts of desktop share to Linux and chromebooks, the days of modern desktop computing are not completely over just yet.

      • Ordeith says:

        LOL.. There's that PWA hypocrisy again. 🤣 🤣

      • Order_66 says:

        Not sure why you have a problem with PWA's since even Microsoft is embracing them, they're working feverishly trying to get edge to eventually support them.

      • Ordeith says:

        I never said I had a problem with PWAs. They're weak sauce, but they have their place.
        The hypocrisy of you embracing PWA while lambasting UWP is what I find amusing. 🤣

      • Order_66 says:

        Well didn't you embrace metro apps when they first came out?

        Today most of the same fanboys that praised metro are praising UWP like it's some kind of software messiah despite the fact they're only slightly less dumbed-down than when they were metro along with pseudo universal capabilities.

        PWA's seem to have a much brighter future, at least on paper, if it lives up to the claims then modern desktop computing stands a chance at survival since Microsoft will not be in charge of its direction any longer.

      • Ordeith says:

        Metro and UWP also have their place. UWP is currently far, far more powerful than PWAs and it is also being rapidly developed. Your hypocrisy remains amusing.

      • Order_66 says:

        UWP could be more powerful than PWA's currently, I wouldnt know, developers are singing a different tune so time will tell.

        And it's far from being hypocritical when someone points out a email program from Windows 98 has more capability than the most current UWP mail app bundled with windows or that a person could use one program built into windows xp to listen to music, watch videos and have several other niceties like visualizations, eq settings, cd ripping and burning, format conversion etc.

        UWP requires two "apps", one for video and one for music, and both apps combined can't even come close to the niceties WMP had.

      • Ordeith says:

        >I wouldnt know

        That's the first truthful thing you've said this year.

        Of course you follow up with a whole bunch of misinformed nonsense about UWP that belies your hypocrisy. oh well.

      • MyDisqussion says:

        If software moves from the desktop to web-based solutions, the OS will become mostly irrelevant.

      • seglertx says:

        It's already happening or has happened. Android passed up Windows as the most popular OS on shipped devices in 2013 and passed all versions of Windows for website visits about a year ago.
        Microsoft came out with Android and iOS apps for Office about 3 years ago and has Office Online for use from Linux desktops and Chromebooks. The desktop / laptop market is the only one where Windows is still the most popular OS and it's still Windows 7 that's most popular. Linux is on 100% of super computers and the majority of web servers. The vast majority of smartphones and tablets run either Android or iOS and they far outnumber desktops and laptops in numbers and usage and have for years. Students in school use Android or iPad tablets and Chromebooks now and many have never used a Windows system.

      • seglertx says:

        I'm not sure why you're using Virtual Box or PlayOn Linux unless you're running games that you bought in the 90's. All you have to do is install Steam and the latest NVIDIA drivers which are both in the Linux repositories. All of the games bought through Steam allow you to play on any platform the game supports and about two thirds of the most popular games on Steam have Linux versions.

      • psycros says:

        "Any platform the game supports" usually doesn't include Linux. But you already knew that.

      • seglertx says:

        Linux and Mac OS versions are normally released a few months after the Windows versions but out of the top ten most popular games at any time in Steam, normally two thirds of them are supported in Linux. It's mostly older titles that don't have Linux versions but there are a few studios that still don't release Linux versions. Here are the current numbers of games available per OS on Steam.

        Linux = 4,058
        Mac OS = 6,108
        Windows = 18,976

      • Future Bardock says:

        There are currently over 9000 Linux games on Steam.
        http://store(dot)steampowered(dot)com/search/?tags=-1&os=linux

      • Future Bardock says:

        Wine Staging can play modern games. Wolfenstein II and Crysis 3 for example play very good on Linux with PlayOnLinux and Lutris.
        youtube /watch?v=IbDPa9p_1Ac
        youtube /watch?v=VMe_nU_NCqk
        VirtualBox is not good for games, only good for running windows softwares.

      • Tasburath says:

        Linux fails at the desktop level for the same reason Windows failed at the phone level.

        Developers go where the money is. They will develop for what the majority use because they want to make as much cash as they can. It's a vicious cycle that I don't see changing. Microsoft couldn't even pasy developers enough for windows mobile development.

      • Future Bardock says:

        And the majority use Windows cuz developers make softwares and games only for Windows. Why do developers think they wont make money on Linux? pretty sure people will start buying Linux versions of softwares and games, on Steam, there are lot of people who only buy if the game is available for Linux. Google No Tux No Bux.

      • Ordeith says:

        >Why do developers think they wont make money on Linux

        Because nobody uses Linux. You can't make money where there are no customers. 🙄

      • Future Bardock says:

        lol

    • Captain Sarcasm says:

      I think there may be a significant shift around 2020 when W7 support runs out and a lot of people choose to jump ship to Linux rather than going over to W10. Who knows, by then the Linux desktop may have finally ironed out all the flaws and be ready to become a true competitor to Windows.

      • Future Bardock says:

        Linux is almost there especially with Linux Mint and Manjaro.

      • Captain Sarcasm says:

        I would say it still has a way to go yet. I have Mint as a dual-boot on
        my machine and while I like it, I'm not ready to completely switch just yet. For me it still has a few issues although it's definitely improving all the time.

        Will check that guy's channel out too, seems interesting.

      • MyDisqussion says:

        Linux is always going to be a hard sell on the desktop, because proprietary software is what most people know, and are comfortable with.

      • seglertx says:

        Linux can run proprietary software. I use NVIDIA drivers, Steam to buy and play games, Microsoft Online, and VMWare Player to run a Windows 7 VM for the few games and programs that don't have Linux versions or alternatives. There are a few Linux purists that only run open source free software but they are a minority. The vast majority of websites and web based software are running on Linux systems so you've been using it every day even though you may not have known it. Every time you shop on Amazon, use Google, Gmail, YouTube, or check the weather forecast you are using Linux.

      • Future Bardock says:

        All most developers need to do is port proprietary softwares most people know to Linux using Flatpak and Snap and it will work on any Linux distribution.
        Until then users can use VirtualBox and PlayOnLinux to easily overcome lack of proprietary softwares on Linux. Almost all proprietary softwares work perfectly fine on VirtualBox.

      • sn0wflake says:

        Ain't gonna happen. The train left more than a decade ago.

      • Dan T says:

        I made the jump after going to W10 and hating it. I'll live with the minor linux problems, so happy to be rid of W10.

      • Tasburath says:

        What Distro are you using? Just curious.

      • Dan T says:

        Mint with Cinnamon desktop. Very straightforward interface.

    • Adrian S says:

      Nor mine sadly.

    • Mario Putzo says:

      Well, then gather some friends and craft a desktop!

  2. John Cockroft says:

    I use Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.x as my desktop both at home and work and it is solid, polished and very usable operating but at present is based on good old X11. What would be a great step forward would be if Linux Mint Cinnamon and Mate could move over to using Wayland instead of X11 (as per GNOME). In terms of 'Year of the Desktop', those happy with Windows 10 (which is better than Windows 8.x but still an appalling user interface compared to Windows 7) can keep it! Each to their own. If you are happy with Windows then use Windows. Me - I will be sticking to Linux Mint :) What would be interesting would be to see if anybody chose Linux over Windows if you could actually buy laptops pre-loaded with (say) Linux Mint alongside laptops pre-loaded with Windows 10 in the same shop.

    • Ordeith says:

      >if you could actually buy laptops pre-loaded with (say) Linux Mint alongside laptops pre-loaded with Windows 10 in the same shop.

      There was a time where you could. People chose Windows. Linux machines weren't worth stocking.

      • seglertx says:

        A lot has changed from when stores were first stocking Linux computers. There wasn't a lot of software or driver support available for Linux back then. Now it's easier to install than Windows 10, there's LibreOffice or Microsoft Office Online, and about two thirds of the most popular games on Steam have Linux versions. Most people buy computers online now and Dell, HP, and smaller companies like System76 sell computers with only Linux installed but most of them have Ubuntu 16.04 with that horrible Unity desktop. Mint with the Cinnamon desktop and Manjaro with the Gnome 3 desktop are far more popular distros than Ubuntu now.

      • Ordeith says:

        Meh. Linux is still a failure. 🤷

      • Jerry Ferreira says:

        Linux's predecessor Unix have been around a lot longer than Windows. I've been through Windows 95 to Windows 10 and still use 10 out of necessity. Linux Mint does everything Windows 10 can with the right software and I no longer need to worry about malware, which my desktop got and the malware started encrypting files.

      • Ordeith says:

        Meh. Linux is still a failure. 🤷

      • Jerry Ferreira says:

        Reiterating that Linux is a failure doesn't prove anything. Just because Linux's timeline didn't have the same start as Windows, doesn't make it a failure.

      • Ordeith says:

        Meh. Linux is still a failure. 🤷

      • Future Bardock says:

        Also MS Office 2016 works on Linux with CrossOver by CodeWeavers.

    • Order_66 says:

      And that's another big hurdle for Linux, people need to see laptops and desktops loaded with Linux on the retail floors, otherwise it's out of sight -out of mind when it comes to the average consumer.

      • Ordeith says:

        Stores don't tend to stock merchandise that nobody wants to buy.

      • Order_66 says:

        Out of sight out of mind.

      • MyDisqussion says:

        Like Windows Phone.

      • Ordeith says:

        Which had several times as many users as Linux at one time. that still wasn't enough.
        Shows you how worthless Linux is

      • Fantasm says:

        Yeah. That's a big part of why Linux is not doing as well ass it could. Linux does pretty good though considering it's not advertised, not seen in the public eye and so few in the general population know of it.

        At the same time, perhaps Windows 10 needs to change it's "look" to maybe foster new sales. Seems like a lot of windows 10 systems on display, but no buyers. The computer shops and Best Buy computer department seemed pretty quiet over the holidays...
        Not many people buying PC's but Ipads, Android tablets or phones and 4K TV's were flying out the door... likewise Google home and Alexa devices pretty much sold out....

        I can see how a few Linux systems on display might spark customer curiosity and interest after a few years of the Windows 8/windows 10 look which is getting a little old looking....

    • tommyr says:

      I'm still on 17.0!

    • MyDisqussion says:

      TeamViewer works fine in Wayland if you are initiating the connection. If you are on the receiving end, you need to start in X11, rather than Wayland. It's something beyond the control of TeamViewer.

  3. GoustiFruit says:

    Well, 2017 has been the year of Linux. For me.
    I've always been a pioneer.

  4. roborat says:

    " Unfortunately, 2017 was not the much-fabled year of the Linux desktop. Hell, that might not ever happen. With Windows 10 being such a disappointment for many, however, it is definitely a possibility. Maybe 2018 will be the year..."

    What??!?!? who's still hoping Linux would ever have a year? Hasn't anyone been paying attention to market trends to even think Linux is making a breakthrough year? What??!?!?

    • Future Bardock says:

      2020 when Windows 7 extended support ends.

      • roborat says:

        Is this a personal belief of yours? I suggest you challenge it because history and current trends suggests otherwise. People are switching to W10 as normal with a new system purchase - not because OS support is finished.

      • Future Bardock says:

        >People are switching to W10 as normal with a new system purchase
        That's not people switching to Windows 10, that's MS switching people to Windows 10.

      • roborat says:

        “Surge” might be an over exaggeration. I bet it will be an insignificant blip on the overall PC OS market share.

        Linux PCs did not gain significant market share while the PC segment was growing 10 years ago so why would it grow now when it is shrinking and people’s preferences have shifted to touch and mobility? The platform is a decade behind with an incredibly slow development pace - it is unbelievable that you guys still have hope.

      • Future Bardock says:

        No its not. The only thing preventing Linux from dominating desktop is as i have said before is lack of apps and games available only for Windows. It is most developers fault for getting blinded by Windows market share which they the developers themselves are the reason why Windows market share is almost 90% and not user base cuz most developers are developing apps and games only for Windows which in turn forces users on Windows. Apps and games developers are reason for any OS gaining good market share.
        Lack of apps and games = lack of user base = low market share of any OS.
        Linux is developed faster than Windows, you never used Linux so you wouldn't know.
        Also lack of apps and games on Linux can be easily overcome with VirtualBox and PlayOnLinux. There are also plenty of great alternative apps available in Linux package manager/Software Center.

      • Ordeith says:

        LOL. Bardock and his ridiculous faith. 🙄

    • James LaBarre says:

      EVERY year is the "Year of the Linux Desktop" for some group of people/companies. YotLD seems to think there will be an abrupt, en-mass migration, when it's merely a combination of pain-points, application availability, functionality levels, etc. Much the same way that companies don't leave NY State all at once, they merely get squeezed out piecemeal as the state makes the environment more and more hostile. If Linux didn't become the better choice for you last year, maybe this year it will. Or perhaps your particular needs are such that it never will. Even Linux is not a fits-all solution.

  5. T.J. Duchene says:

    The "desktop" represents less than 15% of all computer devices by Microsoft's own admission in '14. That has not increased, and if I had to hazard a guess, it is contracting. The desktop style of computer device will certainly not die off in offices or in certain fields, but it really is not a major player in the larger consumer market anymore.

    Even its reign in gaming is questionable. In 2017, the PC had many new games, but a large percentage of those were cross-platform releases, meaning that the PC is not an exclusive platform in any sense. Again, there are going to be things where a PC is best, but those are slipping with time. With Bitcoin miners buying up the smaller runs of PC video cards, driving up prices on even older models, it is just going to get worse.

    I don't expect there will ever be a "year of the desktop" for Linux and if there ever is, it certainly won't matter.

    • psycros says:

      Desktops may be dying but laptops are holding their own. Every family I know has at least two, and their almost as hard on those things as they are on phones. They cost less than most phones so laptops keep upgraded almost as often these days.

  6. Ordeith says:

    What part of "had" didn't you understand?

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