The best password managers 2021

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Using unique passwords is essential for keeping documents, data and accounts safe. However, it can be hard to remember them all.

Using password managers is the ideal solution for keeping everything organized. Now that the new year is nearly upon us, it’s time to take a look at the best password managers for 2021.

1. Keeper

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When it comes to storing passwords in one place, Keeper is one of the best options on the market. Users get to choose from a range of plans for personal, student, family or business use. Its two-factor authentication works with the layers of end-to-end encryption on the platform.

Keeper allows users to see password history, share files, sync with devices and integrate with browsers. Users can also receive emergency password access if necessary.

Keeper is compatible with Mac, Windows and Linux computers. Consumers can get the program for free, but the premium plans bring more secure sharing and encryption options. The $35 package for personal use is the standard choice.

2. 1Password

1Password is a strong contender for consumers looking for an all-in-one package. It operates on Mac and Windows computers, as well as iOS and Android devices. Storing passwords in one spot is just the beginning of this manager’s features.

1Password can generate strong passwords as well as store other personal information like credit card information and usernames. It notifies users of any breaches on websites they have accounts with.

With multiplatform local or cloud syncing, consumers can get 1Password for $3 per month for the standard personal plan. The family plan comes in at $5 per month and provides recovery options.

3. LastPass

LastPass focuses on ease-of-use and protection. It operates on Windows, Mac and Linux computers, and users can also integrate it with any internet browser, like Chrome or Safari. One master password protects the rest of the user’s information.

When it comes to accessing these passwords, LastPass provides two-factor authentication for security. The auto-fill options make using passwords for any site a breeze. The family plan allows users to share passwords from cloud storage.

Premium plans include more authentication options and boosted sync between devices. However, users can sign up for the free personal version.

4. Dashlane

In 2018, hacks and breaches exposed almost 500 million private records. Dashlane understands the need for strong security protocols, which is why this platform focuses on providing users with proper control.

They can change passwords at any time, share information across devices and speak with emergency contacts should they have any trouble with passwords. Dashlane can also notify users when a site they use is facing a breach.

Dashlane provides users with a free standard plan right off the bat. However, they can upgrade at any time to receive more sharing and syncing features, as well as more security measures. A family version is $9 per month.

5. Bitwarden

Bitwarden is ideal for anyone who has major security concerns. It has open-source coding, which means anyone can look at it and provide suggestions or fixes for flaws. More eyes bring more protection.

Additionally, Bitwarden gets third-party security firms and independent security professionals to conduct investigations and verify its security protocols. It helps build trust with consumers who can store credit card information, Social Security numbers and passwords.

The free standard plan comes with most necessary features, and the premium option is just $10 a year. Bitwarden works with Windows, Macs, Linux, iOS and Android devices, as well as web browsers.

Password Protection

When it’s hard to keep track of countless unique passwords, it’s time to get help. These top password managers allow consumers to keep everything safe in one place. Some maintain sharing and emergency contacts as a priority, while others focus on verification. One thing they all provide is a reliable way to stay secure.

Photo Credit: Dr. Cloud/Shutterstock

Devin Partida writes about AI, apps and technology at ReHack.com, where she is Editor-in-Chief

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