Microsoft issues some Windows security patches in February after all

Happy PC user

Patch Tuesday occurs on the second Tuesday of every month, and is when Microsoft releases security patches for all supported versions of Windows.

However, due to a "last minute issue," Microsoft was unable to push out the patches for February, and made the decision to delay them until next month, a move that understandably didn’t go down all that well with customers, and even led to Google publishing details of an unpatched Windows bug.

SEE ALSO: Microsoft delays its February patches for a month

While the majority of security patches won’t be released until March’s Patch Tuesday rolls around, Microsoft has taken the decision to issue some Flash patches for Edge and Internet Explorer, and these will be arriving today.

Exactly what these patches resolve isn’t currently known. Microsoft emailed some of its largest customers to alert them to the forthcoming patches but went into no details beyond:

Microsoft is planning to release security updates for Adobe Flash Player. These updates will be offered to the following operating systems: Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows RT 8.1, Windows 10, and Windows Server 2016.

No other security updates are scheduled for release until the next scheduled monthly update release on March 14, 2017.

Image credit: Potstock / Shutterstock

38 Responses to Microsoft issues some Windows security patches in February after all

  1. Captain555 says:

    Yea, I've seen 2 Adobe updates for Flash in W7, in the last week or so. Seems like it was urgent.

    • OldOne5 says:

      Seriosly, Flash had/has so many security related bugs that malware syndicate should get at Adobe with an huge business proposal to buy and maintain it.

  2. async2013 says:

    Ive NEVER seen anyone react like that guy in the picture when hes found out updates are ready

    • Bob Grant says:

      I have when it comes to certain programs, or even Linux, (it took me about 5 minutes to update LMDE2 from a 3 year old version to the latest, on 5 year old laptop hardware and a dying 5400RPM drive, and only took 1 restart at the end of the update to apply the kernel changes) but definitely never something I've ever heard of someone looking forward to in any version of Windows.

    • Ordeith says:

      Microsoft is adding FUSE capability to Windows 10 with the creators update and I'm going to be happy to have that capability in my Windows systems. :)
      Still might not react like that, though.

    • larc919 says:

      I haven't either. That's usually reserved for Windows Insiders getting new builds.

    • Pecan says:

      Update: It's payday, and your raise went through?

  3. MyDisqussion says:

    Flash just needs to die, along with any company that can't operate without it.

    • baggman744 says:

      Chrome killed it a while back, what's taking MS so long?

      • Bob Grant says:

        Google still has flash, but they use a custom version that is a LOT more secure (and stable IME) than Adobe's versions.

        Google just deemphasized Flash, and is trying to put HTML5 up in its place.

      • baggman744 says:

        Google has made HTML5 the preferred and default way to display website content. This means that unless a website has an HTML5 content player, video content will not automatically display. All Flash content will be blocked, unless users manually enable it on a site-by-site basis.

      • infekt_me says:

        This is what is happening with Edge as well but right now its only content that may be questionable. Its supposed to be expanded further but it is still in alpha/beta

      • Order_66 says:

        Are there really people out there using Edge or are you just pulling everyone's leg?

      • Fantasm says:

        Well, I figured Boltman was using Edge... but he's not here anymore so I don't know if anyone else ever used it....

      • realDonaldTrump says:

        That's too bad. It's people like Boltman that make this site worth visiting. Makes the site much more entertaining.

      • Bob Grant says:

        Spam never makes a site "entertaining".

      • Fantasm says:

        Some of it was ok. Some of it was just tiresome...
        Was interesting at tmies I'll admit...

      • Ordeith says:

        More than are using Safari, Mr. Apple.

      • Pecan says:

        Correct again: 5.48% Edge vs 3.47% Safari (netmarketshare, end Jan 2017).

      • infekt_me says:

        Just because you don't use something doesn't mean no one else does.

      • MyDisqussion says:

        The only patch Microsoft released this month is one they didn't even write.

      • MyDisqussion says:

        Google Chrome is my goto browser when there is a site which must use Flash. I don't want to add Flash to Firefox, and Chrome automatically updates flash. At least it is click to run.

      • realtestman says:

        You DO know that Google Chrome also has Flash and that also gets patched at EXACTLY THE SAME TIME, right? Evidently not.

        *facepalm*

      • baggman744 says:

        Gee, you should read the thread next time:
        "Google has made HTML5 the preferred and default way to display website content. This means that unless a website has an HTML5 content player, video content will not automatically display. All Flash content will be blocked, unless users manually enable it on a site-by-site basis."

    • realDonaldTrump says:

      Eliminating Flash would hurt small businesses. Many small businesses don't have the man power to completely redesign their websites every time a new technology like HTML5 becomes available.

      • OldOne5 says:

        I see no problem here...

      • Adrian S says:

        HTML5 have been around for a while now, while I myself have no problem with using flash sites, it is getting old now.

        If people are that worried about using flash, then maybe they should look at the security on their computer.

      • Bob Grant says:

        HTML5 is based off Flash... There are only minimal adjustments required to switch over. If a site can't switch because of technical incompetency, then that site deserves to die IMO. If it just doesn't want to switch, then that's their decision, and they can do what they want, there's nothing wrong with it.

  4. Zootopiaӡססס says:

    I have no issues with Flash, but do use older version on Firefox ESR. Used v10.x for longest time and then went to 18.x, which was last updated in October. V18 was an extended support release but Adobe ended Flash ESR support a couple months ago. Cheap suckers. I just don't care to be the guinea pig with their new releases.

  5. Order_66 says:

    Hard to imagine a company like Microsoft still baking flash into their os in 2017 and then having the audacity to claim it's the most secure windows ever.

    • Fantasm says:

      "most secure windows ever" is debateable...
      Realistically it only has to be a little bit, like 0.001% more secure than other versions.... to be the "most secure windows ever".
      That being said, it's new enough that here could still be undiscovered vulnerabilities waiting to be found. And every change to the code with those frequent updates could cause a new vulnerability...

      • Bob Grant says:

        "And every change to the code with those frequent updates could cause a new vulnerability..."

        They've always banked on the "security through obscurity" system, and now that they have complete control of your system, they will just keep changing things so often that the significant vulnerabilities are harder to find. (it isn't actually designed to reduce the number or severity of the vulnerabilities)

      • Ordeith says:

        Proof?

    • infekt_me says:

      You can turn it off but than Flash won't run so, yeah.

  6. Ordeith says:

    Do as Google says, not as Google does.

  7. callmebc says:

    According to the NVD, Win 10 had about 80x more critical-level CVEs than Win 7 for 2016, and most of those (although not all) were due to updates to Win 10's built-in Flash Player (and the same applies to Win 8.1, although to a slightly lesser degree.) Given Adobe's wretched level of vulnerabilities across its entire product line (Flash Player isn't even their most vulnerable product), Microsoft was utterly irresponsible in including Adobe code in Win 8/8.1 and especially Win 10. Were they thinking of doing some sort of Google-like control of matters? If so, that didn't exactly work out very well.

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