Twitter clarifies rules about abuse, violence, adult content -- promises a further update on November 22

Twitter seems to be fighting something of a losing battle against abuse on its platform, as well as failing to successfully clamp down on all manner of content that supposedly violates its terms of use. In its latest attempt to get things sorted, the company has -- once again -- updated its rules.

The company's latest changes specifically take in the issues of abusive behavior, self-harm, spam, graphic violence and adult content. The announcement is in keeping with Twitter's recently announced timetable for tackling abuse, as is the promise that further changes will be revealed on November 22.

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The latest version of the rules make it clear that abusive behavior may be deemed permissible if it is "newsworthy" -- although Twitter says more details will be provided in this area on November 14. The rules also clamp down on self-harm and "suicide games", as well as revealing how spam will be dealt with. Twitter explains:

When we review accounts that demonstrate spam-like behavior, we focus on behavioral signals, not the factual accuracy of the information they share.

There's an update to the Media Policy page, helping to better define "graphic violence" and "adult content," but a further update is due on November 22.

Announcing the latest rule changes and clarifications, Twitter says:

We have worked on this clarified version of our rules for the past few months to ensure it takes into account the latest trends in online behavior, considers different cultural and social contexts, and properly sets expectations around what's allowed on Twitter. We incorporated feedback from our global Trust and Safety Council, who provided important guidance about how to best present our policies to the world. On November 22, we will share another version of our rules, which will include new policies around violent groups, hateful imagery, and abusive usernames. We are constantly evaluating our rules and iterating to make them clearer. As always, we appreciate your feedback, and we are looking forward to continuing working to make Twitter safer, together.

Image credit: Ink Drop / Shutterstock

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