Would you take a pay cut to keep working remotely?

Almost half of people would and nearly two-thirds would forego a promotion, according to the results of a new survey.

The study by automation platform Ivanti finds 63 percent of respondents would rather work remotely than be promoted, and 48 percent say they would take a pay cut in exchange to be able to work from anywhere. Just 12 percent say they want to return to the office full time in future.

The attractions of working remotely include a flexible work schedule (47 percent), less commuting stress (43 percent), saving money (40 percent), and a better work/life balance (35 percent). On the other hand, the biggest concerns have been less physical movement throughout the day (40 percent), lack of interaction with colleagues (39 percent), screen fatigue (31 percent), and not being able to collaborate or communicate effectively (31 percent). But despite this 52 percent say their moral had a positive boost from working away from the office.

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The study finds 37 percent of respondents would prefer to work from home if given the choice after the pandemic, while 38 percent would prefer a combination of home and office working.

"Just over a year ago, the pandemic reshaped the way that millions of people around the world work, whether or not their employers were prepared," says Chris Goettl, senior director of product management at Ivanti. "It's clear that many employees have found ways to thrive in their remote environments and would prefer to have the freedom to work from anywhere moving forward. As we enter into the next phase of work, in which there will be both remote and hybrid employees, it will be imperative that organizations implement a zero trust security strategy to better protect their digital assets and ensure that employees can access the data they need to stay productive, regardless of where they are working from."

Among other findings are that home internet is the top expense that employees feel their employer should pay for (60 percent) followed by an office chair (43 percent), cellphone (38 percent), and a desk (33 percent).

Finally, some findings that might encourage you to go back to the office after all, 50 percent of respondents have worn pajama pants on a video conference call, 31 percent claim to have gone to the bathroom or taken a shower during a conference call and another 20 percent have taken a video conference while not wearing pants.

You can find out more on the Ivanti site.

Image credit: svyatoslavlipic/depositphotos.com

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