My God, does ANYONE use Internet Explorer?

You might think almost no one after looking at results so far to Betanews poll: "Which is your primary web browser?" Only 9.88 percent of respondents answer some version of Internet Explorer, while 50.01 percent choose Chrome. These results could change dramatically, particularly if a fanboy war erupts or simply thousands of IE-loving Microsoft employees take the poll. But for now, the (currently) 1,812 respondents hugely favor Chrome. I'm shocked.

Betanews readership tends to be highly technical, with tech enthusiasts, IT managers and Windows fans core among them. So I expected early poll results to skew towards Internet Explorer. Instead, Chrome 14, which only released about two weeks ago, locked 35 percent in early polling and has stayed there since. Who are these people using Chrome?

I first posted the poll yesterday, concurrent with a story about Net Applications releasing browser usage share data on October 1. Firefox and Internet Explorer both declined (again) -- 22.48 percent and 54.39 percent, respectively. Meanwhile, Chrome continued a longstanding trend of gains, with 16.2 percent usage share. That's in three years from nothing. Google certified Chrome 1.0 in December 2008.

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Chrome 14's showing surprises, but there is another one. Among respondents, 35.6 percent use v14 as their primary browser. But get this: 12.31 percent -- or more than all IE versions combined -- are using a developer build, v15 or higher.

Firefox also beat out Internet Explorer -- 30.24 percent use FF as their primary browser. Firefox 7, which only released last week, is 21.31 percent. By comparison, 8.77 percent of respondents use IE9 as primary browser.

The poll's findings have merit and then not. There is no qualifying question for a poll of this kind, nothing to filter respondents by, say, profession or technical proficiency. So there's no way to ascertain who is responding. I presume that, based on what we know about Betanews readership, the respondents are more likely to be early adopters. That's the poll's shortcoming. As for its main merit, the poll compels a choice. Many people use more than one browser. So which is more important. For one-half of respondents, that's some version of Chrome.

Betanews commenters express enthusiasm for Chrome, too. "I love Google Chrome", Prasoon Singh writes. "Firefox 4 is ugly and slow on Mac OS X and they're not doing anything about it". Tyler Melton: "I had to give up on Firefox as well. When Firefox 5 and 6 arrived with the same add-on breakage problems that I had to deal with on the old development cycle, only now more frequently and the every present memory leakage was still there I finally said enough is enough".

Roger Schneier writes that "Chrome runs quickly and smoothly on my Asus netbook, while Firefox (which used to be a big favorite of mine) and Internet Explorer are much slower to load and run. In particular with Firefox it's hard to get the cursor to go where I want it".

"Chrome already is the most popular browser in several countries", Mesut comments. "For a world map of most popular browser by country check www.browserrank.com".


For others, Google's browser isn't good enough. "I left Chrome because I do a lot of work with photographs and the colors are not correct", comments Ryan (aka The City Cyclist). "For some reason they appear darker then what they should. It doesn't happen with any other browser, and happens on both my PC's and in both Windows & Linux. If Google fixes this then maybe I'll head back, but until then I use mostly Firefox (currently 7)".

Strangely, or it seems to me, there was in yesterday's post on the NetApps numbers few comments about Internet Explorer. It's still the top browser by overall usage, according to NetApps. So I have to ask: Are there no IE defenders. I really would like to hear from you.

Photo Credit: Microsoft

86 Responses to My God, does ANYONE use Internet Explorer?

  1. psycros says:

    I'll tell you why Chrome is #1.  Download any five shareware or trialware programs and run the installers.  There's a nearly 100% chance that one of them will have Chrome bundled to install by default.  The same users that blindly use Internet Explorer will also blindly install a new program that has "Google" in the name, and of course it sets itself as the default browser.  On the techie side of things, Chrome is pretty fast, but far too limited for those of us who've become dependent upon uber-customizable FF.  And FF 7 is more than quick enough - not to mention its finally (gasp!) stable.

    • nascent says:

      Everything you say is correct, though I do have to address "Chrome is pretty fast, but far too limited for those of us who've become dependent upon uber-customizable FF"

      These people are tech savvy enough to not install extraneous browsers, or allow browsers they don't use as default.  The ones that are, are actually better off with Chrome, it's minimal and light ui, and fantastic speed and memory management are perfect for them.  Plus the auto updating versioning is great for novices.  I keep finding legacy Firefox users: 3.6/4/5/6.

      /a Firefox user

    • nascent says:

      Everything you say is correct, though I do have to address "Chrome is pretty fast, but far too limited for those of us who've become dependent upon uber-customizable FF"

      These people are tech savvy enough to not install extraneous browsers, or allow browsers they don't use as default.  The ones that are, are actually better off with Chrome, it's minimal and light ui, and fantastic speed and memory management are perfect for them.  Plus the auto updating versioning is great for novices.  I keep finding legacy Firefox users: 3.6/4/5/6.

      /a Firefox user

      • psycros says:

        I'm not sure I understand what you're trying to say..somewhat confusing grammar there.  But I say people should use whatever meets their needs.  IE 9 is fast enough and has some interesting built-in features that (sorta) mimic certain FF plugins.  I just really dislike the UI.  Of course, I hate every UI that Microsoft has produced since Office 2003, heh heh.

      • nascent says:

        @betanews-dac4a67bdc4a800113b0f1ad67ed696f:disqus I'm not sure how you're having trouble with my grammar, it reads well to me.

        I disagree, IE is awful.  I spent yesterday trying to set it up for a client as they refuse to use anything else.  The addon system is awful, trying to install an adblock equivalent addon to remove adverts [which the user keep clicking on and installing malware] is impossible when you want to prevent other 3rd party addons from being installed every five minutes.  Visit any major site with IE9 and huge prompts pop up asking you to install addons for the current page.

        Of course the user always clicks yes, and so malware infects the computer that way.

        You can disable addons being installed and the prompts, but then the adblock-like addon is removed.

        Also, as a part time web developer, I refuse to code for IE now, Firefox and Chrome are popular enough for my audience.

      • nascent says:

        @betanews-dac4a67bdc4a800113b0f1ad67ed696f:disqus I'm not sure how you're having trouble with my grammar, it reads well to me.

        I disagree, IE is awful.  I spent yesterday trying to set it up for a client as they refuse to use anything else.  The addon system is awful, trying to install an adblock equivalent addon to remove adverts [which the user keep clicking on and installing malware] is impossible when you want to prevent other 3rd party addons from being installed every five minutes.  Visit any major site with IE9 and huge prompts pop up asking you to install addons for the current page.

        Of course the user always clicks yes, and so malware infects the computer that way.

        You can disable addons being installed and the prompts, but then the adblock-like addon is removed.

        Also, as a part time web developer, I refuse to code for IE now, Firefox and Chrome are popular enough for my audience.

      • Anonymous says:

        @nascent:disqus
        "The addon system is awful, trying to install an adblock equivalent addon
        to remove adverts [which the user keep clicking on and installing
        malware] is impossible when you want to prevent other 3rd party addons
        from being installed every five minutes."

        Built in.  Tools - options - Programs - manage add-ons - tracking and protection.

        It is *not* 3rd party.  :D

        It uses the same lists as "Adblock+" from Firefox.

        Yeah, I didn't know it was there either for the longest time...now if only IE had some decent session management.  ;)

      • nascent says:

        Yeah I discovered the tracking protection, I was using simple.adblock which was working better but tried the tracking protection, though the tutorial I was using directed me to a different list that didn't work, then when I finally found the decent lists in the addon 'store' I was having issues with that too. 

        It probably would've worked first time if I hadn't changed things trying to get the other solutions working first.  But it decided to start working by itself  the following day.

      • Anonymous says:

        Was really amazed at how well it worked.  Like I said though, without the session management I can get with the FF plugins, there's still no hope for it. 

        *shrug*

        One of these days.  (or not...)

    • Jack Olsen says:

      Agreed that for technical users where the browser is a tool, not just a window into websites, FF is the way to go. But I'd argue that Chrome is the superior typical-user browser because it does exactly what it was marketed to do, gets out of the way and lets you just look at web pages. 

      IE9 is a decent browser, but the fact that it takes ~15 minutes to install and requires a Windows restart is absurd. Both Chrome and Firefox can be installed in under a minute without restart. And microsoft continue's to shoot itself (and all web developers) in the foot with rigid versioning which practically force certain types of users to continue using ancient versions long after they've become obsolete.

      I installed Chrome v1 and now I have 14...and I never had to do a thing.

    • Anonymous says:

      That is laughable. Btw, I installed Chrome myself - it is clearly a winner.

      Only two class of users will continue to IE 1) Those who are employees of Google's competitors 2) Users who can be tricked into using defaults on Windows by Microsoft  

    • harryE says:

      I am using Firefox since version Firebird 0.6. My main reason why I am still using Firefox is Delicious. But I am getting increasingly disappointed with the speed and stability of Firefox (currently version 7). Otherwise it did a great job as my casual browser (e. g. for reading news etc.). Chrome is in all my environments much faster since I don't use extensions in Chrome. The extensions are the main reason for performance and memory consumption problems in FF.

  2. Anonymous says:

    I was early to move to FireFox, but as soon as Chrome came out, it became my default browser by choice. I seeked it out early on, not downloaded it by accident. I use Chrome on my home built pc, my laptop, and now my Acer tablet that I'm typing this on right now.
    Chrome rules...

  3. FixXxeR says:

    I am only using firefox right now because my college uses ANGEL which does not work properly in chrome. Once chrome is supported, I am dropping firefox like a bad iPhone.

  4. bsf says:

    chrome doesn't work on my work PC :(
    It's been banned as a "potentially dangerous software", haha... sigh

    IE works but only upto version 6.0 is allowed...

  5. LW says:

    I've used a lot of the browsers out there, but after trying Firefox out for about 6 months, Chrome for 6 months... and now I'm back to internet explorer and I find it the most appropriate for my use. It's clean, quick, and cooperates with my ecosystem properly. As with all people though, we need a backup browser for compatibility problems, which I fall back on firefox for.

    I simply don't trust Chrome anymore, I don't like seeing my browser history being stored even if I tell it not to. Chrome also consumes a lot of system resources when you're actively using it (many tabs) which can be frustrating depending on the machine being used.

    Let's also not forget that IE is a common browser for corporations to use, namely my own work having standardized on versions of IE.

  6. Jason Johndrow says:

    Often times people will vote a bit different then they act so this whole thing is hogwash. Gotta look at the actual numbers which don't align with above.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Opera Next anyone?

  8. Ethan Brockman says:

    This is great news! Down with IE!!!!!!

  9. Anonymous says:

    IE is a klunker -- even the newest version.  Runs at a snails pace when you compare it to Chrome.  The only reason I ever fire it up is for multi-player games at Zone.com, as the site requires IE.

  10. dingomutt says:

    What is this?  Some kind of my dick is longer contest?  People use what they like not because they're dumb or technologically challenged.  They use it because it works for them, it's there, it's convenient, and among other reasons.  I've used internet explorer since the beginning and have used all the other major internet browsers (firefox, chrome, and opera).   I prefer internet explorer because it does what I need to do and it does it well in my system.  Yes, IE will run slow if you're on a pentium 4 running xp with 512 mb of ram.  I hope you guys that are complaining that it's slow and a clunkier actually have a better system than I listed.  
    And Joe Wilcox is the biggest flame baiter known to history.  I just laughed when he was praising google's chromebook when I knew myself this would be for a niche market.  Now he says he's giving it up and going back to windows.  

  11. browser rank says:

    Explorer is still the dominant browser across the world. Chrome has started overtaking all others to become the most popular browser in several countries but it is still even behind Firefox. The world map of most popular browsers by country is available at http://www.browserrank.com

  12. Chris says:

    Unfortunately, the answer to your question is "yes".. Even though this blog has a lot of technically savvy readers that would eschew IE for something far better, I can tell you that in the developing world, this is not the case. I currently live in China where technical competency tends to be quite low amongst many internet users. There are 500m internet users here (at last count) and, from what I can gather, the VAST majority of them use IE (and IE6 at that).

    There are two reasons for this that I can see. The first is that many people are using pirated versions of WindowsXP and have not bothered to upgrade to another browser. That yields the second reason -- that the entire web here is written in the bastardized version of HTML that MS pushed with IE6. If you try to use another browser beside IE to get anything done here and the web will will be quite a frustrating place. ActiveX is everywhere -- every bank, utility, shopping service, etc. uses ActiveX controls for "security" and won't let you log in without them. I realize the irony of this, but it is the facts. Every time my wife logs into her Chinese bank account, I wince when the ActiveX security question comes up. It is maddening. But, it is China.

    So, while you might be surprised by the discrepancy in the polls versus the collected data, I can assure you there is a good chance that both are accurate.

  13. Hall9000 says:

    I use Avant browser ver 11. Why? Because it's a hell of a lot better than even the latest IE version. Yes, I do know that Avant browser uses the IE engine but it's the user interface that makes all the difference. Avant and a lot of other browsers were years ahead of IE before IE started tweeking its user interface and IE still fails miserably. No wonder other browsers and Avant are so popular because Microsoft just doesn't seem to be able to get it.

  14. AnDre says:

    this stup1d f0ck (joe suckcux) thinks bashing microsoft products makes him look cool... he clearly is a google wh0re. pathetic old man, stop sucking ser-gay's d1ck.

  15. I was trying to defend IE9 yesterday, but because I was using Chrome on Galaxy Tab, I could not post...Chrome on Tablet sux big way...
    I am primary user of IE9 (though I use chrome on the side). Microsoft was very right to concentrate on user experience speed and not on test speeds. For example if you open some heavy news sites and navigate backwards and forward, I bet that IE9 will be the fastest browser for the user. Even "fishtank" test on beautyoftheweb.com is faster on IE9 than Chrome.
    IE9 gets even better when you turn ON "ActiveX filtering" and "tracking protection" with adblock. For other browsers you would have to install adblock as a plugin - but content filtering is integrated in IE9 architecture and it works much better without using more resources.
    So with my IE9 configuration it beats any browser hands down in usability test and speed of navigation. I showed my coworkers (who are fans of Firefox and Chrome) how their belowed browsers compare to properly configured IE9 and they could not believe their eyes.

    The biggest problem of IE9 is technical users with invalid perception. Especially for home users - tech's should advertise IE9, because of SmartScreen filter, which does the best job protecting users from roque downloads and phishing sites.

    Regarding myths like "IE uses more memory" and other bullcrap...I have Sony Picturebook with 128MB of RAM and 600Mhz processor. WIth Windows XP and IE6 I can browse internet - it is usable. With Chrome it was 2 times slower (even though Chrome was using less memory). Installed Lubuntu with Chrome - and it was impossible to use internet at all - need to wait for a minute until it renders one page. So don't tell me that linux is faster than windows or chrome is faster than IE :)

  16. Anonymous says:

    I'm a web developer. I use Chrome and FF through choice, IE purely to test web code that otherwise looks fine in every other browser but IE manages to mess up. I spend more time working around IE's inefficiencies & faults than anything else. Sorry Microsoft fanboys, but that's just how it is in the real world.

    • harryE says:

      That has changed dramatically since IE 8 and IE 9 - that needs to be acknowledged. The rendering differences of web standard conform pages are quite little with modern browsers and easy to fix. Doing the same for IE 6 and IE 7 was a nightmare.

      • Anonymous says:

        That's a fair point Harry, but unfortunately Windows XP which still makes up the majority of Windows corporate desktops ships with IE6 as standard, and most people either aren't allowed, don't know how, or can't be bothered to upgrade. The dark shadow of IE6 still looms large! :(

  17. Simon Johnny says:

    I read betanews via my.msn.com RSS most of the time, so I don't usually get to see any polls done on the website unless its an actual news artical like this that interests me.

    I use Internet Explorer, have done since flash went crazy crashing several years back in firefox and never looked back after the hardware acceleration was added to IE.

    I do have Firefox 4,5,6 or what ever version it updated to this week but I tend to only use it for a few sites that have issues with their code, or idiotic web masters that block IE for what ever reason.

    One thing I do like is the scripting on Firefox, and its a shame there isn't a 'scripting' plugin for IE as well. Chrome however, I'd like to stay away from google based products. It feels very much like I'm being sucked into a lot of google services, right now its hardenough to even break away from using Google as a main search engine without having to have a google account for youtube etc.

    But I have to wonder, why JoE Wilcox didn't get the browsers from the server logs rather then relying on people to vote?

  18. Eddy Suwito says:

    my mother goto helo there would like to buy iphone 5

  19. John Crane says:

    I have to use IE 7.0 at work. Newer browsers simply will not work with some of the intra-company apps that we have to use. I work on software that requires IE 7.0 and above in order to support our customers, but if our customer base is changing, we'll have to change.

    I believe somebody on Betanews pointed out that Firefox 6 (and also 7) are memory hogs. So much so that my anti-virus program informed me about a rogue program trying to take over memory. For that reason, I switched to Chrome. However, for those times when I still need Firefox plug-ins, I use Firefox.

  20. robert_tlse says:

    Yup use IE9 at work, and the only thing i like about it is that i can switch compatibility mode easily for testing design in ie7/8/9 in the same browser.

    Primary browser is FF7, i'd maybe switch to Chrome, but:
    1) i like my ff extensions
    2) i hate how Chrome doesn't give you a choice of pinning your extension icons wherever you feel like ..with 30+ extensions, it just doesn't cut it in Chrome :) I also have a slight preference for firebug,  than the developer tools that come in chrome, especially for editing css on the fly. What i do miss in firebug is the ability to inspect events bound on dom items, but ..there's a plugin for that.

  21. jp_ext says:

    I use IE9 as my main browser and Chrome as my secondary.
    All browser are more or less the same now so it does not really matter which one is used..

  22. Myke Black says:

    I'm a web engineer, so I build sites to work in the latest version of IE, then check other browsers after that - 99% of the time if it works ok in IE9, then it works fine in all other major browsers. It's a much quicker way of doing it than making it work in the more standards compliant browsers, then having to rework the code to operate correctly on IE. That's the reason why I need to use IE9 as my primary browser.I also use Firefox with firebug to debug CSS quirks and the other browsers like  Mac Safari (running as a virtual machine) and chrome are just used for cross browser testing.
     Thesedays a lot of time is spent testing sites for iPads, which is becoming a more popular medium. I'm surprised your survey does not include this option.

    • Anonymous says:

      Ditto on the FF/Firebug, but I have to say that I disagree that it's easier to develop for IE9 than standards-compliant browsers. As usage shows, IE is in decline (although still needs to be supported) but the majority of users now are using FF, Chrome, Safari or another webkit based browser.

      Standards first, IE's quirks later. YMMV...

    • guru_v says:

      I'm only working on becoming a web engineer, but from the feedback I have gotten, Opera is the most compliant to standards which have actually been adopted. [Those which have become de facto, having been muscled in by Microsoft don't really count.]

      • Anonymous says:

        "Those which have become de facto, having been muscled in by Microsoft don't really count."

        Depends on the customer.  For many, lack of support for the "defacto", isn't going to get you anywhere.  Thankfully, that list is growing smaller by the day.

  23. adrian47uk says:

    I use Iron on windows 7, which is produced from the source code of Chrome, the version I am using is 13, I had to put another browser on your poll. 

    On Ubuntu which is installed 9on my laptop I use Chromium.

    I have not used IE for years on my own computer, I got a copy of Iron on my external hard drive, so I can install it without using IE.

    Used IE on sunday when sorting out someones laptop, I can understand why people are changing browsers

    • guru_v says:

      You're spending too much time reading Betanews, and not enough time paying attention to the Twitter feed from SRWare - Iron 14 has been out since last week, and takes care of some nasty Flash bugs which were very annoying on all my Windows systems [XP, Vista, Win 7]

  24. evan2k says:

    how about revealing these statistics from your web server logs. They would be more reliable,  without fanboys messing with the results.

  25. Firefox 7, sorry...

    Interesting post! I`ll send it to all my friends!

  26. tontito says:

    It would be more reliable to read the user agent headres from your web server logs and count...

  27. lfmmoura says:

    Microsoft should rename Internet Explorer. IE 9 is actually a very good browser, but the previous versions were so slow and, in some cases, so unstable that many average users don't even want to hear about a newer version of IE. Still, when using a Windows machine I prefer Chrome because of its sandbox. Firefox would be my last choice. I don't like the way it renders text, and at least on my machines it's a resource hog. Perhaps this will change in the future. 

    When using a Mac, I prefer to use Safari simply because it's integration with the new Lion interface is much better. But back when I was using Snow Leopard, I would still prefer Chrome over it.

    When using a Linux machine, I prefer to use Chromium. Even though I've had a better experience with Firefox on Linux than on Windows, I still find the Chromium engine hard to beat.

  28. Mat Barry says:

    If you ask anyone that doesn't check tech news sites such as this, aka below-average PC/Mac users that make up a large percentage of population; they won't know what Chrome even is.   They're also the same users which are riddled with viruses, but you get the point.  I'm using chrome right now as well, so at least your "semi-knowledgeable" reader polls seem to be correct.

    • Anonymous says:

      I would disagree.  My guess is that by now the average user has seen the ads for chrome plastered all over the net and now even on Television.

  29. Benjamin Lipman says:

    I use chrome instead of ie9 because the tiny simple things like right clicking and seeing options I would want to use. They also silently update and don't crash as much as firefox. IE  is great, but it's still not as smooth to use as chrome.

    • adrian47uk says:

      That is one thing I don't like about Chrome is the auto update and also I don't trust Google, that is why I went for Iron instead. 

      I hate this auto updating, I like to know when things are being updated. i do know that you can stop chrome from updating

  30. woe says:

    I not sure what stats you are reading but decline or no decline Chrome still has a LONG way to go to push out IE for the number one slot.

    I use IE9 only because I have Windows 7 at home and at work.  On a Mac I use Safari.  I used to use FF on a Mac, but the Mac version is/was buggy for me.  Both are designed to best work with the OS.

    Chrome is a good browser, but I simply cant trust Google at all.  They only reason they built a browser was to max out the INFORMATION SUCK from its users.

    The best part about IE9 is Tracking Protection, where I BLOCK many Google tracking sites.

    At work IE trumps all others if you use Active Directory.  The use of GPO's (1800+ for IE) trumps any advantage another browser has.  I can controll every aspect of our users browsers via GPO's.  Home page, favorites, security settings etc.  Push those settings to 10,000 users with 1 click.

    • adrian47uk says:

      use Iron instead of Chrome, google will not get any more info from that than they with any other browser.

    • guru_v says:

      The best part of IE 9 is that you don't have to use it!  Also, I feel sorry for the corporate drones and automatons who must use a Microsoft browser.

  31. p51d007 says:

    I used FF from version 1.x on, but I've been playing around with the x64 version
    of Pale Moon and LOVING it. 

  32. jrb says:

    I think there's more than around 2,000 people on the internet. Last time i checked, which was a few years back, the count was up to at least 7,000 people. I think a handful of those had 2 PCs, so maybe the results were a little off. 

    But seriously, this is betanews. everyone here is way too hip to use IE. That over half of the respondents use chrome isn't a surprise.. it's that all us hipsters are STILL using it, now that everyone else uses it. 

    • Anonymous says:

      Don't worry, we're all moving to palemoon now.  Sure, it's firefox...but it's  not.  ..and no-one uses it, so it's definitely hip.  ;)

    • harryE says:

      Sure! IE is usually only for those who don't know better - and that is still the majority.

  33. Anonymous says:

    Shades of some 1930s political polls predicting Republican victory over FDR..

    Opera (12) is my main browser and has been for years, but I had to switch over to IE9 to post this!  With Disqus, the login just ran on and on until cut it short, reloaded and it finally showed me in.  However, the Comment box still shows "Please wait."  Could your poll results be affected by your login system?

    I use IE9 for sites that don't like Opera and for printing where Opera's lack of on-the-fly print functionality is a hindrance, which is often.  From about Firefox 4 through version 6, Firefox has been the worst for internet printing, getting more pages wrong in print preview, if it even got them at all - a lot.  I quit trying.  Now, on a couple quick checks, FF7 seems to be much better. 

    What I like about Opera is that I can design and control the browser layout to a great extent, including using config files from many versions ago, and that much of what I need is built into its functionality, vs. being an add on (e.g., Speed Dial).  The problem with IE9 is that its UI is now stripped down and there's little modification possible.  From this standpoint, Firefox is just a souped up version of IE, offering somewhat more modifiability.  But the latter is virtually all in the add-ons, which makes the user a prisoner of FF's developers' layout and whatever others come up with for extensions (e.g., FF's speed dial as an add on vs. Opera's one built in; and try putting the tab bar on the bottom in FF or IE9).   

    • guru_v says:

      Must be something in either Opera 12 [still in alpha stage] or Disqus [which, on the pages I see it used, and the ones where I have been on the other side, sucks like a jet engine at 6 feet distance].

      Using Opera 11.51 works great for me, here and in other places - but I am awaiting the first betas of Opera 12.

  34. Taylor says:

    I'm a Firefox user, but Firefox and Chrome change way too much/too often for corporate America. I work at one of those companies and they like to stick with a browser model for 3-4 years. We only recently upgrades from IE6 and IE 8 is now the official browser.

    Software that the company buys costs millions of dollars to make and it typically doesn't work on anything else besides IE because when we look for a vendor to produce something, it has to be IE compliant, so they use IE (and IE only) to test against. I doubt we are the only company like this.

    Even if we did switch to Chrome or Firefox, results could vary between different months based on their release cycles which could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to fix depending on how widespread the change is. Plus, documentation (with pictures) have to be done for users so that they can navigate the browser. With the rate that they are changing the GUI, new documentation would have to be created nearly yearly or more.

    So until Chrome or Firefox can lock in and not change things for 2-3 years at a time (or else create a "corporate release" that remains supported with bug fixes), then it is not a viable option for large corporate businesses.

  35. ethan335 says:

    I use IE9 at home together with win 7, because I like using apps that have good integration with the OS you're using (unless they suck and you need a 3rd party app).
    I have no problems whatsoever with IE9, I don't see the point in adding another browser to my system just because they claim they can render a site 0.0000000005 seconds faster...

    • adrian47uk says:

      It is not all about speed, I just hate IE, I don't know why, I hated it when i first used it on windows 95.

      I used Netscape/firefox for years, and last year I found Iron and that was it, it been my browser of choice since.

      • guru_v says:

        I love Iron, but, as with Firefox, when you install a couple of extensions that do any polling, the browser slows to a crawl on any system without multiple cores. For single core systems, Opera trounces anything else quite soundly, and is neck-and-neck with Iron [faster than Chrome due to some eliminated code] on my multiprocessor systems.

        On the system I am on at this moment - an AthlonXP 2200+ with Vista and 2GB memory, Opera loads and runs the egregiously slow Betanews page quite well, while i must usually wait about 25 seconds to start scrolling the Betanews page with Iron.

        Though this is a seriously slow system to those on the bleeding edge, I encounter these and similar spec'ed systems daily while working on computer systems for various public sectors. This means that Opera has taken this into account, while the Chromium project boys are building for those with at least three cores, and lots of main memory. As usual, MS has shown they don't care, with the many [still a majority, from my personal observations] who still use XP are left to other browsers, as Internet Exploder 8 is both slow and unwieldy.

        On my four core AMD systems, Iron wins the day, mainly due to great extensions, otherwise, it's Opera that still has the power to do the job well.

      • Now thats an argument, you hate it, not even knowing why. Well at least dont expect to  be considered smart just because you follow the fashion of hating anything MS does for no reason.

      • Now thats an argument, you hate it, not even knowing why. Well at least dont expect to  be considered smart just because you follow the fashion of hating anything MS does for no reason.

  36. sam.prosser says:

    As a web application developer for both corporate intranets and commercial systems, I can say IE is the only browser for which I don't need to invest significant time testing / quirk fixing. In my development, Chrome and Firefox both have a history of obscure but serious bugs that cost me significant time and effort.

    • Troy Will says:

      Nice troll.

      • Anonymous says:

        Huh? I'm responding to the poll. My comments are to qualify my vote for Joe. I couldn't care less what the 'enthusiast' community thinks. If we were to qualify votes by credibility in the industry, the results would look very different.

      • Anonymous says:

        Huh? I'm responding to the poll. My comments are to qualify my vote for Joe. I couldn't care less what the 'enthusiast' community thinks. If we were to qualify votes by credibility in the industry, the results would look very different.

    • guru_v says:

      Sam, does your main paycheck come from Microsoft? It certainly sounds as though that is the case.

      • Anonymous says:

        Ha! No, I work for a company in the fortune 15. Yes, I'm a Microsoft fan, simply because they make a good platform. They are the only platform maker that has a clue how to serve developers.

  37. Patrick Chua says:

    Firefox V8, developer tools are still top-notch compared to what's currently available with IE9 and Chrome

  38. Jeremiah Pegues says:

    You have to be okay with constant, annoying updates to use anything that's NOT IE. I love Chrome, but both FF and Chrome are very often and easily exploited.

  39. google traffic says:

    In all fairness to Google, their browser is pretty good. I wonder what took them so long to develop a browser since data capture is what they are after.
    IE 9 is just playing catch up and no reason to switch.

  40. Steve says:

    I don't and never will!  :)

  41. Steve says:

    I don't and never will!  :)

  42. maxpowerxp says:

    IE9 isn't a bad browser.  The problem for them is, Firefox and Chrome are better.

    • harryE says:

      After the lousy IE 6 and IE 7 the versions 8 and 9 have been a huge step forwards for Microsoft. IE 9 is a solid browser and IE 10 will be much better. The problem for Microsoft is that the long release cycles don't allow them to deliver the bleeding edge features many tech savvy users expect. I am a web-developer since 16 years and I am always curious about new technologies. Opera, Chrome and Safari are the browsers who deliver new technologies mostly first. Microsoft was always slow in the adoption (e. g. with CSS 3 and HTML 5 features). Since I am working on 5 OS platforms I prefer also a browser which I can use everywhere. Therefore I am mixing Firefox (for casual browsing) and Chrome (for development because the debugger is great). For casual browsing I could imagine to use IE 9 but I would miss my Firefox extensions. For development I can't work with a debugger which can be found in Chrome and Opera (built in) or Firefox (using Firebug). What Microsoft delivered was probably to little, too late for stopping the decline. The concept of heavy integration seems to be an anachronism in the web-oriented world and Microsoft has to re-invent its software strategy from the ground. Windows 8 is an indication that they are doing it. If Windows 8 will be a success they could gain ground again with IE 10 since the feature list is promising. Until then other browsers will continue to cannibalize the IE market share.

  43. Anonymous says:

    I use whatever. I am really not anal about browsers. If Firefox is on a computer fine, same goes for IE or Chrome. On my Mac its more about Safari because its 64 bit and Chrome still is at 32 bit. Never cared for Firefox on a Mac. Never used Opera and never will. I have found that every browser has its share of issues from time to time. When one messes up I just switch to something else. When a security issue comes along on one. I just use something else for a while. I am more concerned about proper rendering and the browser working and not crashing then who designed it or if its Open source.

  44. I use Safari, because it's really amazing and doesn't require anything... Yet it's only 32 bit for windows, and I use x64 Windows

  45. I use Safari, because it's really amazing and doesn't require anything... Yet it's only 32 bit for windows, and I use x64 Windows

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