Windows 10's share grew by just 5 percent in a year

Shocked

According to NetMarketShare’s figures, Windows 10’s share of the desktop operating system market remains pretty uninspiring, with growth much slower than you’d expect.

In fact in a year, the new OS has grown by just over 5 percent. In comparison, Windows 7 grew by 2 percent in the same time frame.

Of course, this is usage share, rather than market share, but in some ways that’s more important as it shows the percentage of people actually using the different operating systems.

SEE ALSO: Microsoft: We disabled third-party anti-virus software in Windows 10 Creators Update to keep users safe

June wasn’t a great month for Windows 10 either. It went from 26.78 percent share to 26.80 percent, a growth of just 0.02 percentage points.

Windows 7 went from having 49.46 percent share to 49.04 percent, a dip of 0.42 percentage points.

Windows 8.1 fell 0.34 percentage points and now stands on 6.40 percent. Windows 8 dropped 0.22 percentage points and is on 1.37 percent. Combined, Windows 8.x has a 7.77 percent share, down 0.56 percentage points in the month.

XP enjoyed a mini resurgence as people fired up their aging PCs for the first time in a while -- perhaps to install the new security updates from Microsoft -- posting a gain of 1.28 percentage points. It now has 6.94 percent of the market.

Will July be any kinder to Windows 10? We’ll find out in a month’s time.

Photo credit: Dean Drobot / Shutterstock

120 Responses to Windows 10's share grew by just 5 percent in a year

  1. Harry says:

    In addition, StatCounter has Bing world market share at less than 3%. I don't use it personally however I'm really surprised by the low number, assuming it's accurate.

    • Order_66 says:

      Bing is actually not bad, I use it on occasion, not nearly as robust as google but it gets the job done every now and then when I'm forced to use it at work.

      • Harry says:

        Are you in the U.S? I understand it is a lot better there.

      • Order_66 says:

        Yes.

      • Pecan says:

        That's probably the reason for the low score overall - like a lot of MS stuff it only even 'almost works' in the US.
        Look at the figure for Edge as well - that's only ~5%, even though it's a forced-install/can't-remove on those ~35% win 10 machines.

      • Fantasm says:

        Yeah, even here in Canada there is a noticeable drop off in features... not even just MS stuff... other services have the same issue....

      • Harry says:

        I've stated a few times that the shockingly low uptake of Edge is a stain on W10. I find W10 to be a solid and fast OS but Edge remains embarrassing. Further, I believe W10 S is doomed if limited to Edge. From the day W10 was released I've wondered what was MS smoking releasing its main browser so clearly not ready. MS are now reaping what they sowed.

      • Pecan says:

        Unfortunately I see the whole of 10 as "so clearly not ready". It's a lot better after 2 years than it was at release but the 'WaaS' strategy limits it to people who neither need nor want a stable platform. LTSB is ok, as far as it goes, but it's still a stategy and design built for toy computers, not as a stable statement of 'this is how it works' that professionals can build on.
        Edge was the worst example (I haven't looked at 10 since October last year) of 'unready' but the entire strategy is based on "we'll change it whenever we want to", which is anathema to most developers, relying on the OS to remain more or less predictable for at least a few years.
        (Just don't get me started on the non-removable cortana and other cr'app's. At least edge offers a useful function for most people).

      • guru_v says:

        That's a ringing endorsement, if ever I've heard one [NOT!]

    • Ordeith says:

      And ChromeOS at 0.56%, down from 0.8% last month. 😀

    • Fantasm says:

      I don't use Bing so I'm not surprised. I've tried it a few times but it's not as good as it could be...

      • Harry says:

        Yeah, it cops a lot of flak outside of America. I note NetMarketShare has it at 7% world wide.

      • Fantasm says:

        Like I've said before, when Bing gets my street wrong all the time, it hardly inspires confidence....

  2. Bardock says:

    You must minus the Windows 10 market share generated by forced upgrades in order to get close to accurate value of Windows 10 market share.

  3. Morgan says:

    10 is crap. Too much spyware, app problems, no performance improvement over 7. The only people using 10 are forced to!

    • Harry says:

      " The only people using 10 are forced to! ". Rubbish Morgan, utter rubbish. 500 million users can't be forced.

    • TechFan says:

      You aren't even worthy....

    • 1DaveN says:

      No performance improvement? LOL, maybe you should try it. The first thing you'll notice is that it boots in 1/3 the time.

      • guru_v says:

        I cant believe that people still repeat this lie! Boot times are faster due to SSDs in most Windows 10 machines, and the TRICKERY used to keep the PC in a "groggy" but not asleep state.

        As was many times proven, with test after test, Windows Last is AT MOST 6% faster than Windows 7. That hardly is compensatory when one considers ALL the minuses of Windows Last.

      • Fantasm says:

        Windows 7 took about 1 second longer to boot than did Windows 10....
        And once they were both equally populated with software, W10 was a bit slower....
        As it is, my Windows 7 PC only takes about 5 to 7 seconds to boot from an SSD anyway...
        A fresh install of either means an apparent speed improvement at boot up. The newer OS always looks like it's faster in comparison to what was there before, even if it's the same OS....

    • Adrian S says:

      Crap? no, i would not go that far, underneath it is pretty good. windows 8 under the skin was a huge improvement on windows 7 to be honest, software ran better and smoother. while i do not think windows is a high improvement on windows 8 it is slightly better, so it would be a big improvement on performance over windows 7. No getting away from that, even I can not fault it for that.

      But yes the spying is a problem for me, so is the forced updates, the awful universal apps that is being forced onto us, the junk that Ms is installing as default and not allowing people to uninstall in the normal way and cortana which is always running in the background unless like me you rename the folder so it can not run.

      I presume t here are people using ten who are not forced to, plenty of MS fans on here that will do what MS tells them, I know one or two people that are using Windows 10 by their own choice.

  4. Order_66 says:

    This is absolutely embarrassing on so many levels for microsoft and their tiny and utterly irrelevant number of fanboys.

    Windows 10 has great potential but is held back by an enormous amount of arrogance and terrible decision making.

    • Ordeith says:

      Windows 10 is far ahead of Windows 7 in your region (according to Statcounter). You're practically counterculture at this point. 🤣

      • Harry says:

        Had a look at my country ( Australia ) and found W10 at 53% and W7 at 32%. Wasn't expecting that to be honest. Great Britain has similar numbers as well.

      • guru_v says:

        Shows you CAN fool some of the people ALL THE TIME...

      • Ordeith says:

        Order_66 is certainly one person that is a fool all the time. 😁

      • MacGillaPhoil says:

        Asia is where it is really being held back and impacting the overall numbers. It is combination of hard to pirate (vs XP/7) and governments in places like China that hold it back.

        That said late this year/next year corporation uptick will start and the numbers will shift.

      • Order_66 says:

        Windows 10 is one of the easiest operating systems for someone to pirate and activate if not the easiest.

        Your "hard to pirate" claim is false.

      • Fantasm says:

        Actually it is hard to pirate....
        None of the pirates want it.....

        A few times I've noticed more people seeding/leeching W7 than W10....

      • Order_66 says:

        Haha true

      • Order_66 says:

        Statcounter -guffaw-

      • Ordeith says:

        🙄
        QQ.

  5. Mike Ward says:

    I hate windows 10, and am going back to Windows 7

    • 1DaveN says:

      Thanks for the warning - I'll sell my Microsoft stock. Or better yet, buy more - they make double when you change the OS on your PC, and however much they favor 10, they'll take the money either way.

    • MacGillaPhoil says:

      Golf clap!!!!

  6. Slavic says:

    It's almost obvious that Microsoft's attempts to quickly make users to forget Win32 programs and direct them to Metro-style UWPs from MS Store instead (and make them rush to update from Windows 7 to 10) were failed. But it seems that Microsoft didn't elaborate any "plan B" for such case. No transitional or specific desktop-oriented version of Windows 10 with further improvement of Win32 support. Only the endless attempts to gradually "improve" a look of Start menu and current desktop UI, tiny improvements in privacy settings, but a lot of fanfaring about "great security", which has been refuted a lot of times. MS management simply refuses to see the truth.

    • TechFan says:

      Oh the shame. Microsoft offering a store (something dominated by Google and Apple)....the shame. And shame of Microsoft making programming tools to convert your Win32 app to run in a UWP container, make it super easy for developers...the shame...

      • Pecan says:

        The shame that Win32 applications don't work so well when you put them in a locked MS box.
        The shame that, while 'apps' might be different, anyone who wants those on a working computer prefers webapps.
        The shame of "one size fits all, it's phone size and we control it so we'll change it every few months, without telling you exactly what we've changed"
        The shame of making anything less than LTSB unmanageable by sysadmins.
        The shame of designed-for-phone screens on high-res multiple monitors.
        The shame - because I know Ordeith likes this example - of still having a sub-standard 'start menu' after 2 years.
        Which is why there is no rush to make UWP apps. No developers desperate to switch tech. No need to train everyone for win-10 specific Ugly Interface. No demand for 10 (or 8/8.1).
        It's as Nadella said - 10's an OS most people tolerate, not many like.

      • Fantasm says:

        The difference is that Google and Apple both seem to have successful stores.
        Microsoft, not so much....
        Most long term windows users are used to other ways to get software....
        Those that might have really wanted a closed, safer "store" to get software have probably already migrated to Apple....
        As for UWP, the problem is that the average user sees no tangible benefit from it.... That's even if they understand it....
        There's not even that much of a benefit to developers... Sure, it might be easier to write something for all W10 devices, but at the same time, it means forgetting about everyone still running earlier versions of Windows.... Whereas the alternative is to write code that everyone on earlier versions of Windows can use as well as those on Windows 10....
        Even converting a Win32 program to a UWP "app" is just one more level of effort for very small benefits.... and at this point, with such low adoption of windows phone, it's just too much additional effort....

      • MacGillaPhoil says:

        "Most long term windows users are used to other ways to get software.... "

        And a Windows 10 users can get and install software EXACTLY the same as Windows 7 user. However a Windows 7 user can only get Win32 apps.

        Like the store/UWP or not it is just an option.

        "Those that might have really wanted a closed, safer "store" to get software have probably already migrated to Apple"

        The Mac App store is largely a failure.

        Only mobile platforms have had success with app stores. Then again with iOS you really have no choice unless you jailbreak.

      • Fantasm says:

        "However a Windows 7 user can only get Win32 apps."
        Yep, That's one of the advantages of Windows 7....
        .

      • Ordeith says:

        Oo

      • TechFan says:

        Wow - that logic is flawed.
        Windows 7 - only Win32 programs
        Windows 10 - Same Win32 programs, but Apps

      • AuntyNF says:

        'but Apps' is a Don't Care condition for many if not most - so no advantage to supporting them.

      • Fantasm says:

        "'but Apps' is a Don't Care condition for many if not most "
        .
        Yeah, I think there's already been a time when "apps" were the big thing. But now, everyone has more or less settled into the "apps" they regularly use. And I don't just mean Windows, it's happening with all of them. I spent yesterday for example, wiping a few of my Android tablets to get rid of the ones no longer being used and just left the core stuff that gets used a lot. There wasn't a lot to begin with, now there's less....
        Sure a new "app" comes along once in a while... but that's about it...
        For most people there's only so many ways to take a picture,... or find your way home.... read an eBook... . They've all been done to death....

      • Fantasm says:

        "Wow - that logic is flawed."
        So is your grasp of sarcasm....

      • Order_66 says:

        "The Mac App store is largely a failure"

        True, the thing I like about the Mac app store is that it has full-featured modern programs along with "apps", unlike the Microsoft store that just has weak and dumbed-down "apps".

      • TechFan says:

        You do know Windows Store does after Win32 apps.

      • TechFan says:

        The average user just wants to click and install. The average user doesn't care, as long as it's easy to install, easy to update, easy to find where you bought something to install again (which is one reason most gamer's just get there games from Steam...one store). While you try to make it look like having a store is a bad thing, there are a lot of advantages to stores.

        As for iOS and Android Store success - Of course it would be, there isn't really options, you get your apps from a store. Windows is gives options, this still doesn't mean a store is bad.

      • Fantasm says:

        "there are a lot of advantages to stores"
        .
        Agreed on the "stores" part.... not so much on the idea of a single store.... no competition and too much control over what's available....
        .
        As for the average user, I'm not even sure they all know there is a store....

      • guru_v says:

        Not a shame, but extremely stupid. If people would have fallen into this trap, another walled garden would have happened, and one less benefit of the open nature of PCs would be gone.

      • TechFan says:

        Apple and Google have killed most reasons for the open nature of the PC. iPad (iOS) and Android. We have a new generation of humans that love time wasting finger games and quick second swipes. It's a niche desire to build a PC, hunt things out to install and maybe learn to program for fun (as we did). The benefit you talk about is still there, but not really a major selling point to the new generation.

    • Fantasm says:

      If there was a real reason to move to Windows 10, then I suppose I would too, despite the ugly UI and all that. I'd probably leave it physically unconnected to the internet as well unless for some stupid reason I had to, and use Windows 7 for going online....
      .
      But to me there simply isn't. There is nothing that I want or need to do that I can't already do in Windows 7.

    • 1DaveN says:

      I think MS believes UWP to be the way forward, for things like better security and reparability, and for the fact that they'll run on anything from a phone to a desktop PC. But as for Win32 - every app they sell and make money from is Win32 (unless you count the card game for Win10. Not sure if that's a billion dollar business yet but I suspect not). All the UWP stuff like OneNote etc. are all free.

  7. TechFan says:

    We need some better reporting here (talking to you Wayne).
    What is the break down from consumer and enterprise (companies).

    I have a feeling consumer market share is close to maxing out. As for companies, 2018-2020 would be the try sign if Windows 10 is successful.

    • Order_66 says:

      "We need some better reporting"

      Translation: we need a reporter who will praise Microsoft like some holy deity and ignore actual facts, logic and reason.

      • TechFan says:

        You are right, because less info on stats is the way to go (mainly as it helps paint your anti-MS picture).

  8. Another_Lurker says:

    MS tried to force users to move when there is no compelling reason for most to move even now. There are no new compelling features in W10 to make most even seriously consider moving. The one feature they botched was the app store. If they made the app store into a repository with both apps and w32 software available that might have been a killer feature. Now one has a one stop, blessed source of software with the ability to update all installed software from one source. That is a feature Windows still lacks. But they were blinded by mobile and by their own failure to understand what problems their users (aka customers) face.

    Given the annual turnover of PCs (~225 million) and the approximate installed base (~1.5 billion) one would expect the W10 percentage to about 35% to 45% based on natural attrition and upgraders not ~27%.

    • Ordeith says:

      >expect the W10 percentage to about 35% to 45%

      Well, Statcounter is saying 36%, so... 😀

    • Pecan says:

      To be fair, there are several features of 10 that are better than 7. Unfortunately, they're buried under and outweighed by the desperate mobile-touch-phone-telemetry/updates 'service' strategy, with some things such as UWP being an outright fail.
      If MS had made a 'better 7' there wouldn't have been anything like the resistance (although still many howls of outrage, because internet ^^), instead they've sold us something that, with a fair bit of work, is 'almost as good as 7' for professional computing.
      Still, they seem happy to turn their backs on their 90%+ desktop market-share in return for a tenuous presence in the consumer fashion-gadget world. Desktop users should return the favour and turn their backs on MS.

      • Frylock86 says:

        What are the "better" features I am curious to know?

      • Ordeith says:

        Hyper-V, App guard, Linux subsystem, ISO and VHDx support, to name a few.

      • Frylock86 says:

        Hmm I see. I use Windows 8.1 with Classic Shell which offers some of these features minus the huge unacceptable annoyances of 10 - Hyper-V, ISO and VHDx support at least.

        App guard is in Enterprise only right, so it's out of my reach anyway. Linux subsystem/Virtual File System I can do without since I can dual boot or run distros in a VM. Haven't understood what this Container/Docker thingy is and how it is different from a VM. If you can explain it, would be nice.

      • Ordeith says:

        App guard is coming to consumers this fall. Virtual file system allows extending the OS file system and all.file utilities to cloud storage providers with a pull down and sync on demand. Very handy.

      • Adrian S says:

        Which for joe public will mean nothing.
        windows 8 supported ISO fine, I have no need for the others.

      • Ordeith says:

        Quite presumptuous of you. 🙄

      • Adrian S says:

        If I went out into our town centre and asked 100 people about those features, I expect I may get one or two who know what they are.

      • Ordeith says:

        And?

      • Adrian S says:

        that would mean that most people would not know what these features are, so are not important to most people

      • Ordeith says:

        Applications and the OS utilize those capabilities to give a better UX, you don't need to know about them to benefit.

      • Mabutu says:

        How do technologies like Hyper-V, App guard, Linux subsystem, Containers, FUSE and Virtual file system support, ISO and VHDx support entice the masses to move over to Windows 10? Vast majority of Windows 7 users don't see any real point to upgrade to an OS that takes away more of their freedom, control and privacy. Honestly, the incentives to move to Windows 10 are just not appetizing enough.

      • Ordeith says:

        Better to be thought an idiot than to post that comment and remove all doubt. 🤣

      • Mabutu says:

        So convince me dude. Tell me what I don't have in Windows 7 that Windows 10 has. Cortana and cloud support? LUL!

      • Ordeith says:

        Hyper-V, App guard, Linux subsystem, Containers, FUSE and Virtual file system support, ISO and VHDx support, to name a few.

      • Mabutu says:

        LOL! And why do I need these new features in Windows 10 to make me ditch Windows 7? Try to answer seriously if you can. ;)

      • Ordeith says:

        I doubt you'd have the intelligence to follow.

      • Mabutu says:

        I'm certainly intelligent enough to see that you're a typical shill for Microsoft. Welcome to my block, pal. :)

      • Ordeith says:

        You're certainly ignorant enough to not know what you're talking about. Enjoy your bubble, snowflake.

      • Greg Zeng says:

        W10 differs greatly from W8 & W7. I found that the NTFS partitions work much better now. I've alway run Ms-NTFS-compressed partitions on our notebooks.

        Multi-booting with Linux, and multi-booting with a few Windows operating systems, creates errors on any file system. The latest Ms-NTFS recovers much more quickly than ever before.

        W10 seems to be much improved in its hidden workings, it seems to me. Faster booting & closing. Smoother at multi-tasking of many simultaneous utilities (multiple-backups, web -surfing, defragging, & tedious background-error-checking; all at the same time). Linux could not do this as well, after many attempts.

      • Pecan says:

        They are all incremental improvements that could have been added to 7 (or something like it) without the complete change of strategy and the phone-UI.
        Multi-monitor support is the only one I ever made much use of. Ordeith has already listed some of the others (thanks Ordeith). It's a good OS at heart and core functionality builds well on what has gone before as well as removing some obsolete tech. Restricted usability and, especially, manageability mean we don't use it any more though ...
        ... except that we do! We have a couple of 10 machines sat in the (naughty) corner again for a while.

      • Fantasm says:

        I use 5 screens (all different sizes and resolutions) in Windows 7 without any problems....so W10 isn't required for that either....

      • Pecan says:

        No, it's not, which is why I said "incremental improvements". I've never had 5 decent monitors at the same time (jealous!) but such support was available via utilities and, for instance, Linux for decades. Windows was late to the parade but it's undeniably better that it's there at last.

    • 1DaveN says:

      I use reminders and notifications. I get a massive productivity boost from the fact that I get these things on whatever device I happen to be logged into. I use "ask Cortana" in Edge multiple times per day to get a quick definition, map, etc.

      I can't point to a single major feature that I like better in 10 than 7. The dozens of minor features add up to a great experience - I've got a Win10 and a Win7 on my desk at home, where switching between them only involves changing the monitor input and checking a box in the Mouse Without Borders software. I use the 7 for Media Center, but nothing else.

    • Adrian S says:

      Pro-MS people will say that Ms did not try to force users, but that is up to them, I am one of the ones who have had to sort out peoples machines after windows 10 have been installed on it when they did not want it.

      As for the features in windows 10 and features, sure there are new features if you want cloudy stuff. but even with older versions of windows there is software available for cloud use, even One drive if that is what you want. Oh I forgot MS stopped the one drive app working on Windows 8.1 so if you want to use one drive you had to use it within windows.

      For me, windows 10 offer me no more than Windows 8.1 or windows 7, to be honest Windows Xp would do what I want to do and this just to run the software I use. But windows 7 is better as it handles memory better and it is 64 bit, saying that I have got a 64 bit version of XP. Windows 8.1 is even better than Windows 7, I know a lot of people will disagree with that, but my software run better on 8 than 7, again better memory management, just a shame about the GUI, but thankfully that can be changed.

      Windows 10 is a different thing, it is not just an OS, I think MS calls it a computer environment system or something like that. Ms wants us all to get into their eco system, wants all to store our data on their servers, all have a MS account. this is fine if that is what you want to do, but not all of us do.

      I would really have very little problem with switching over to Windows 10 if they just allowed us a bit more customisation. like turning of telemetry, getting rid of cortana.

      • Cole Peterson says:

        You can turn off Cortana's analytics, you can turn off telemetry, and you can use Windows 10 without a Microsoft account.

        The reason you think Microsoft is forcing a Microsoft account on people is because they require it to use features involving syncing, social networking, and to add apps to your account. This is obvious. You can't sync anything on your computer with any other device without somewhere for that information to sync to.

        If you have a phone with the Cortana app signed into your Microsoft account, and if your computer is also signed into the same account with Cortana on, you'll get your phone's notifications on your PC. This can only be done if your notifications are received by Cortana, sent to a Microsoft server, and sent back to your PC. Microsoft isn't taking your data and spying on you or selling information about everything you do on your device.

        That's simply how technology works and always will work. This is a feature that is extremely useful, but you'll read it as, "you must be signed into a Microsoft to use this," so you won't use it, and you'll curse Microsoft for requiring an account for the feature. Stuff like that.

        To turn off telemetry, go to Settings > Privacy. Pretty simple. If you've heard online that you can't turn off telemetry completely, do more research. You can turn it off completely. People say you can't because during the days of the Technical Preview pre-release, Windows 10 wouldn't completely turn things off. This is because it's a Tech Preview, a beta. The entire point is to find bugs for Microsoft to fix and to shape the OS to fit what people want. So telemetry couldn't be turned off. This was changed in the RTM build, and ever since release, telemetry can be turned off. Same thing's true about the "keylogging" things (there was never a keylogger, but Cortana would document your searches when you pressed Enter. This changed when the OS was released in RTM as well.)

      • Adrian S says:

        It may be possible to turn of cortana's analytics and I say may because there is no proof it is switch off, since cortana keeps running in the background, so what is it sending and if it is not sending anything why do Microsoft insist on it running in the back ground? As for telemetry, not possible to turn that off full stop, sure we can put it to back level, but that is it, there is no I do not want you to send info back to Microsoft switch.

        I do not think MS is forcing MS accounts onto people as such, but they do seem to be pushing it and i wonder when people buy a new computer how much it is pushed compared to a local account. Even installing Windows 10, the MS account option is in your face, but the local account is almost hidden.

        Granted if you want to sync your computer to other devices or want to use Ms cloud services you need an MS account, but i do not require any of that and why on earth would anyone put Cortana on their phone?

        It seems to be that companies want to know too much info about us, I go into my local supermarket and they try to push some loyalty card in my face, which if i sign up and give them all my info, they then keep track of what I buy and then they think they are doing us a favour by giving us a whole point for each pound we spend, and then we need 500 of those points to get £2.50 off our shopping,, oh big deal. It is not us that really benefit it is the company as they can then try and push other stuff that we may like onto us for us to buy.
        That data must be worth a fortune to them,
        Even TV sets want to know all about us these days, when i get a new Tv it will not be connected to the net.

        Give it a few more years and we will have fridges and freezers that will send info back to some company wanting to know what we eat and when, or how about a washing machine that sends info back about our washing habits, what detergent we use or a cooker that will send info back about what we cook.
        It seems that we can not get away from having info about sent somewhere. Technology do not have to be like this it really don't.
        Windows 10 do not have to have telemetry, if Ms wants us to have it then as us, give us an option.
        If you believe that there is not a keylogger in Windows 10 then you are naive,

    • Brian says:

      The store does have apps and w32 software, it just has to be packaged for the store through the Centennial bridge. Spotify, iTunes, and Office are a few w32 apps that have been repackaged to be included in the app store. These apps are w32 and will not run on mobile.

  9. redrum says:

    Peak Windows has been and gone.

    • Adrian S says:

      A few years back, with desktops and laptops sales slowing, windows sales have dropped with it. sure Ms have tried to get into the mobile market again and failed, again and MS is now trying to get Windows onto more portable devices, but a lot of people do not want windows they want Android or ISO.

      • Cole Peterson says:

        Two-in-ones are exclusively a Windows market, and that market is growing. People don't buy new PCs much because they last. Android and iOS won't replace Windows. The iPad Pro and the Pixel C are not two-in-ones. Windows Mobile was the leading smartphone OS from 2001 to 2007. Windows Phone 7 came out in 2009 because Steve Ballmer made a mistake of not doing it earlier (what he said was his biggest regret as CEO). In 2012, Windows Phone 8 came out and it reached peak market share in 2014. Right now, iOS has the same market share WP8 had at its peak.

        Don't be naïve. Popularity is decided by much pettier things than quality in this market.

      • Adrian S says:

        But people are replacing windows with IOS and Android, they have got rid of their computers and now use a phone or a tablet to do what they did with a computer. I am not saying power users are using tablets and phones, but people who only used their computers for browsing, watching videos, email stuff and even some office style work, like a bit of word processing.
        Power users, those that do graphic design, 3D stuff, video editing, play games will stay with a PC. A few years back I was sorting out a fair few computers for different people or building new ones, but i have not built a new machine for a couple of years apart from mine a couple of months back.
        People do not buy PCs because they do not want them and do not use them.

        i do not know how windows mobile could lead the market because to be honest it was awful, I have a HTC S710 with Microsoft Windows Mobile 6 in and it was just awful to use.

  10. psycros says:

    If Microsoft isn't looking for a Windows 10 exit strategy by now there may not be much hope for them as a maker of end-user software. Maybe its just as well...their becoming irrelevant now that Office has been largely supplanted by cheaper/free alternatives that work just as well or better. I suspect the future of Microsoft will be in cloud services almost exclusively. If not for the Windows gaming monopoly, would anyone even miss them?

  11. John Scott says:

    Nothing to get users interested in upgrading. I noticed a general disinterest in technology in general. Is it that older technology is good enough, or new is really not that great?

    • Pecan says:

      Both.
      Hardware stopped being the bottleneck around the late 90s. Now it's being able to write and maintain the amount of software that's required.
      New technology is just a fashion-statement for most people so OS-level stuff doesn't figure (except for the fanbois and girlz).

      • AuntyNF says:

        Excpt for VR... but it remains to be seen when or even if it moves beyond being a niche.

      • Fantasm says:

        It will likely stay a niche.... Limited usage in the workplace except perhaps for specific tasks / environments...
        At home, it would be good for some things, but a 1/2 weight hanging on your face for a while will get tedious... not to mention the lack of social interaction.... 3D TV manufacturers couldn't get families to wear 3D glasses to watch movies, so I think a VR headpiece might run into the same obstacle...

      • Pecan says:

        Yeeeeessss, buuuut .... hmmm. VR is still one of those things that's been 'possible' for a while but really, outside niche cases, do people want it? I was talking about 'computing power' rather than HCI as such but I don't think the hardware's holding VR back as much as finding any reason for most people to want it. Similar to 4k TV - it's possible and available - but who, actually, wants to spend that much money on not much more functionality?
        When it comes to the niche cases that count, in terms of large amounts of money, MS seem to me onto a real winner with their emphasis on the AR/MR applications while everyone else is messing around with games. Hololens is, obviously, out of the reach of the mass-market but it's also the only real game in town at the high-end. Meanwhile the recent 'AR' headsets from various manufacturers will, I think, soon threaten the 3x more expensive Vive/Occulus.

        VR isn't any more OS-level than anything else though (otherwise neither Vive nor Occulus could work on 7 and other systems).

      • AuntyNF says:

        Fair enough... I was just responding to 'hardware stopped being a bottleneck' in terms of what might get people to buying new, more powerful, PC hardware again. I typically buy some new hardware every year or so (either a piecemeal incremental desktop upgrade or one of the new cheap 'ultrabook-lite' laptops from China) because my interest has turned to maximizing the utility I can extract from minimal hardware (power and $) I could spend more but there's no 'killer app' out there as a forcing function (I'm not a gamer nor do multimedia HTPC stuff like transcoding videos, etc...)

      • Pecan says:

        Oh yeah, I got that you were talking about VR putting the emphasis back on hardware, but I think that's not even the case for desktops - PSVR shows even a console can do it. Headsets are more of an issue but even so, it's the software that so far has not provided a compelling reason to buy-in to the tech.
        One of those things - as prices get lower, more software will be written (and it will get better as devs get used to it), more software means more hardware sales, more sales mean more market for the software, etc. ... It's coming, but it's still a hard call to say when.

  12. Dave says:

    Wow people still install that spyware os???

  13. MacGillaPhoil says:

    Wayne has used Steam stats in the past as well.....when they are negative.

    Neowin is reporting that Windows 10 is up 1.28% this month and that all other versions of Windows are down but Windows overall is up.

  14. fredreed says:

    I wonder why. Maybe It 's because of the fact that Microsoft never tests these builds at all before they release them to the public. Windows 10 could have been the greatest OS ever but It's far from being that and I doubt that It will be considered the greatest OS of all time.

    Microsoft refuses to test any of these builds and I'm predicting that many people who currently use Windows 10 will be switching from using windows 10 in another 2 or 3 months time mostly because people are fed up with how poorly this OS is currently at. Most people have been using window 10 now for quite a while It's not going anywhere fast except to It's very slow death.

    Final say Microsoft might be trying to get everyone to use windows 10 but at this point in time forget It Microsoft you clearly blew It. Time to move on.

    • TechFan says:

      Insider Builds = testing
      Windows 10 with CU = better than Windows 7 (at least as stable).

      • Mabutu says:

        That is hardly a selling point for Windows 10. And how is DirectX 12, is it dead yet? What a joke that was! (still is)

      • Ordeith says:

        So far it's Vulkan that's the joke. 🤣

      • Mabutu says:

        No, don't delude yourself now. DirectX 12 has not offered any convincing performance so far, but instead, it's been a disaster (plenty of reading out there for anyone to see). DirectX 12 has only proved to be a vendor lock-in technology and to force people to upgrade to Windows 10. Bad intentions. Very bad.

      • Ordeith says:

        You're the delusional one. So far, Vulkan can't even beat DX11, let alone 12. Meanwhile DX12 has shown tremendous performance and effects improvement, especially on AMD hardware (plenty of reading out there for anyone to see). Your comment has only proved to be FUD from a desperate hater. Bad commentor. Very bad.

  15. MadMartigan says:

    lmao...

    More fodder for the Drama club...

  16. Tommy Shanks says:

    Really, who cares. It's just an operating system. If Vista still works for you, then use it. Happen to like Windows 10 with its forced updates and telemetry? Use that. I hear some people like Linux...
    What I'm saying is that all those operating systems run on essentially the same chips, made up of the same transistors, as they have for the past 30 or so years. For that reason, there can be no 'innovation' in software, only incremental improvements on a relatively stable base. A great leap can occur only when that hardware underlying the code fundamentally changes...And I don't mean ARM vs AMD/Intel pissing contests here. All the rest is just marketing. Some buy into it and others don't. Planned obsolescence is always the rule.

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