Articles about Security

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware gets new look, simplified workflow

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Malwarebytes has shipped Malwarebytes Anti-Malware 2.1.4, a significant update for its popular malware hunter.

The interface has been revamped for a cleaner look with a "toned-down" color scheme. The changes aren't too drastic -- you’ll find your way around easily enough --  and on balance the UI worked well for us.

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Anti-censorship site Greatfire.org suffers massive DDoS attack

Anti-censorship site Greatfire.org suffers massive DDoS attack

GreatFire.org, the website with the aim of delivering uncensored news to China, has been hit by a massive DDoS attack. The attack started on March 17 but the anti-censorship site has only just gone public about it and made a call for help.

The organization believes that the attack -- which it calls "censorship by brute force" -- could be a response to an article in the Wall Street Journal. With a peak of 2.6 billion page requests per hour, servers were simply unable to cope with the traffic, knocking GreatFire.org's mirror sites offline.

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Opera acquires VPN firm SurfEasy to boost browsing security

Opera acquires VPN firm SurfEasy to boost browsing security

Opera Software, the company behind the web browser of much the same name, has acquired SurfEasy, a provider of VPN security. SurfEasy's software bolsters the security of internet users by adding a layer of encryption that helps to protect privacy.

More than this, the software also makes it possible to bypass some online restrictions and to access sites that are region locked. Few details have been revealed yet, but it's possible we could see VPN features integrated into future versions of the desktop and mobile Opera browser.

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Giving pirates free Windows 10 is a goddamn good idea

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Meet the new Microsoft. Maybe the company really charts a new course under CEO Satya Nadella's leadership. Colleague Mark Wilson reports that even software pirates can upgrade free to Windows 10. Seriously? Reward the thieves who rob revenue from the platform's cradle? Hand robbers sacred possessions at the door? Give them the house keys and ask them to lock up after they take the tellie, silver, and jewelry?

Outstanding! I really am not being sarcastic, just pretending to be. The strategy is simply brilliant and too long coming, assuming nothing changes before Windows 10's summer release or Microsoft clarifies licensing rules to mean something different. Without even stressing a single synapse I can conjure up more good reasons for the upgrade plan than the fingers on my hands. But I'll keep the list a bit shorter for this post.

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Electronic payments coming to Facebook Messenger

Electronic payments coming to Facebook Messenger

Facebook is introducing support for sending and receiving money through Messenger. Starting in the US in the next few months, users of the social network will be able to make electronic payments free of charge. While this is not a service that will rival the likes of Apple Pay or PayPal, it provides a way to quickly send money to a friend.

This is not a payment system that has been completely built from the ground up. It's based on the same backbone that's used to process payments for gamers and advertisers. Security is understandably of paramount importance, and Facebook stresses that as well as encryption and PIN protection for all, iOS users will also be able to take advantage of Touch ID.

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Windows Hello and Microsoft Passport to revolutionize security and the Internet

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Typing a password is prehistoric. Sadly, many of us enter multiple passwords every day. Not only is it tedious, but potentially dangerous. Remembering a unique password for every site and computer is almost an impossibility. This leads to people reusing the same password at multiple sites,  which is a poor security practice.

I got wise recently and started using Lastpass to generate and secure my various credentials. Fingerprint scanners such as those found on some of the newer iOS and Samsung Galaxy devices enable biometrics to unlock your device, but also interface with password managers like the aforementioned Lastpass, or 1password. Sadly, similar solutions for Windows computers have been bolted-on and are clunky to say the least. Today, Microsoft announces that it is putting a real focus on biometrics with Windows Hello and Passport.

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Predictive communication helps optimize online sales

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Modern businesses spend a lot of money on customer service and on e-Commerce solutions, but often it seems that there's a disconnect between the two.

California-based company Altocloud has come up with a solution that combines machine-learning technology with real-time communications to predict the right time to interact with customers.

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Yahoo introduces On-demand passwords and demoes end-to-end-encryption

Yahoo introduces On-demand passwords and demoes end-to-end-encryption

The idea of forgetting the password for your email account might seem odd, but it happens. You might be one of those people who signed up for a Yahoo email address years ago, moved on to something better, and now only check in every few months to see if you've missed anything.

To combat the problem of forgotten passwords, Yahoo is introducing a new feature called On-demand passwords. There's no need to battle through the process of answering security questions to reset your password when you forget it; now you can create a temporary password that gets sent to your phone.

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How to neutralize 2015's most dangerous security threats

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Recent speeches by UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, and US President Barack Obama demonstrate that cyber security is still a huge concern for national governments. We should be in no doubt that another raft of counter-measures is being considered at national and international levels.

However, those in charge of IT security in the business community are not necessarily taking their cue from world leaders to re-evaluate their own policies and ensure they are still offering protection from the kind of cyber attacks that are likely to occur in 2015.

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Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver still serving up malware

Jamie Oliver

Three weeks ago we reported on how celebrity chef Jamie Oliver’s website was serving up malware. The site, www.jamieoliver.com, has around 10 million visitors a month, so the fact it had been hacked to redirect people to an exploit kit was a big deal.

Naturally, Jamie Oliver’s management team acted swiftly to fix things, except according to Malwarebytes, which discovered the original problem, the site is now dishing up digitally signed malware.

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Google Apps leaks Whois data for over 280,000 protected domains

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Private information relating to more than 280,000 domains registered via Google Apps has leaked, leaving the registrants open to risk of identity theft or spear phishing.

The ability to buy domain names from one of Google's partners is a feature offered by Google Apps to allow easier access to and management of services.

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GCHQ does not engage in indiscriminate blanket surveillance

GCHQ does not engage in indiscriminate blanket surveillance

When Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the activities of the NSA, it sparked a global interest in how internet traffic is monitored. The UK's Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament today published a report into online surveillance carried out by GCHQ, MI5 and MI6 after an 18-month inquiry.

Among the findings is the conclusion that surveillance is legal, but an overhaul is needed to increase transparency. The suggestion that GCHQ's interception of emails "does not equate to blanket surveillance, nor does it equate to indiscriminate surveillance" is likely to be met with skepticism. But what's likely to raise more eyebrows is the revelation that the agency has apparently managed to crack encryption.

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Cyber attacks rise as confidence in avoiding them falls

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According to a new survey by the CyberEdge Group although IT security spending is increasing, confidence is falling, with the majority of respondents expecting to be breached in the next 12 months.

The survey of more than 800 security decision makers and practitioners finds that more than 70 percent of respondents' networks had been breached in 2014, which is a 62 percent increase from the previous year.

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BetterCloud provides added security for Google Apps

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There's no doubt that cloud office platforms offer gains in productivity and easier collaboration, but they also present challenges for information security teams who need to limit content sharing.

For organizations that must comply with industry regulations like HIPAA this can lead to significant legal risk which, until now, was extremely difficult to mitigate.

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Panda Security identified itself as malware, quarantined its own files

Angry PC user

Security software can be inherently dangerous. That appears to be a statement that doesn't seem to make sense, but it does none-the-less. We've seen it time and again, as well-meaning tools cause chaos with computers. The problems over the years have run the gamut from endless reboots to dead systems to files "accidentally" removed. The software has the best interest of the user in mind, but sometimes it goes too far, treading beyond the line of safety.

Such is the case in this latest incident which affected customers of the popular anti-virus program, Panda Security. It is not the first, nor likely the last, to cause these issues. By it's very nature, the programs search for files identified as malicious. The problem arises from the definitions it installs with each update. These are designed to search for malware, but can also appear as the culprit for which they are looking for.

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