Latest Technology News

Google is reading your email to track hotel visits -- helps you have fun away from home

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Traveling and staying in hotels can be quite the adventure -- both good and bad. Of course, the quality of the lodging can determine the overall experience. If you check in and find a dead hooker under the bed, or stains all over the rug, you are going to have a bad time. Conversely, staying in a quality hotel can be quite the luxurious experience. Frankly, I have been on vacations where staying in the big comfy bed all day and watching movies was the highlight. Let's not forget room service -- eating fried mozzarella sticks and dripping marinara sauce everywhere? Who cares, its a hotel! The maid will clean it, right?

Unfortunately, leaving the hotel and looking for something to do in the vicinity can be an ordeal. I mean, going to a restaurant or attraction sight unseen could prove to be hit or miss. Choose the wrong restaurant and you will be stuck on the toilet for the rest of your vacation -- yuck! Today, Google announces that it wants to help users have a good time while on vacation. While that sounds great, the search giant is doing it in a creepy way -- by reading your emails!

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Cooler Master V1200 Platinum -- a shockingly great power supply unit [Review]

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Self-proclaimed tech nerds around the world are turning their backs on system-building. This is tragic, as this art is part of the foundation of the tech nerd lifestyle. It is hard to argue with these perceived traitors -- an off-the-shelf tablet such as an iPad can do very much. In other words, why spend the time and money building a PC? The same can be said for much in life. I mean, why cook when you can get take out? Why mow your lawn when you can pay someone to do it? The answer is simple -- fun and self satisfaction. Yes, building a computer is a rewarding experience and everyone should at least attempt it.

System-building is something I am still a fan of and I know I am not alone -- you guys are out there. Amazing components are constantly being released -- motherboards, processors and even power supplies. A power supply is the unsung hero of any system build. It literally powers the computer! It is sad how often people choose cheap PSUs for their builds and instead focus on the "fun" stuff, like RAM and processors. I have always cautioned against cheap power supplies. When I say "cheap", please do not misunderstand -- I am referring to poor quality and not low price. If you can get high quality for a low price, awesome. However, if you've never heard of the manufacturer, it is probably a good Idea to pass. Recently, I saw a new PSU from world-renowned manufacturer Cooler Master that got my motor running -- the V1200 Platinum. Once I wiped the drool from my chin, I obtained one to review.

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Why is iPhone so destructible?

Shattered iPhone 5s

It's the question I keep asking, wondering whether to blame the device or my daughter. Last night, she texted: "My screen cracked again. I'm so sorry". That's the third shattered iPhone 5s since May; two 5ers busted before that. Clearly, she's fumble fingers, but something just doesn't seem right. The college student sticks the damn device in a protective case. Did Apple put pretty design before damage durability?

I spent several hours searching for smartphone breakage data today -- on the web and contacting several sources compiling stats. Strangely, the most compelling comparisons are years old. For example, in late 2010, SquareTrade reported that iPhone 4 accidents exceeded the 3GS and devices from competing smartphone manufacturers. In a 2012 survey of 2,000 iPhone users, 30 percent had damaged their device in the previous 12 months.

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Rival smartphone makers are no longer afraid of Apple

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There was a time when Apple was the undisputed king of mobile. Since the release of the first iPhone in a barnstorming speech by Steve Jobs, the company went from strength to strength, dropping better models every year, and absolutely dominating the high-end mobile market.

Apple sold out of the launch shipments of the brand-new iPhone 5s in under two days, and sales of the iPhone have maintained Apple's profits despite a recent drop in iPad sales. But since Steve Jobs' death, Apple's competitors have been getting bolder. With the launch of the upcoming iPhone 6 coming in September, a number of high profile rivals have been snapping at Apple's heels with aggressive marketing, attack ads and a general lack of respect for the venerable giant of mobile technology. Here are a couple of hints that Apple's competitors are sensing a weakening of the giant.

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China investigates Microsoft for being a monopoly -- is the company guilty?

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Thanks to technology, the business world is shrinking. Compared to prior decades, it is becoming far easier for businesses to operate in multiple countries. While this has the potential of being great, it also can be bad. After all, economies are not puzzle pieces that fit together nicely. No, sometimes there is an oil and water situation, where things don't mix.

Ultimately, communism and capitalism will never work together hand in hand. In other words, for an American company to operate in a communist republic, such as China, there will be pains. Today, it is revealed that China is investigating Microsoft for being a monopoly and has raided its offices.

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Millions of Android devices could be at risk from Fake ID flaw

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A newly uncovered flaw in Google's Android OS could leave large numbers of mobile devices at risk from malicious apps that appear to be from trusted developers.

Named 'Fake ID' by Bluebox Security who uncovered it and notified Google of its presence, the vulnerability lets malicious applications impersonate specially recognized trusted applications without any user notification. Although a patch was issued in April it's likely that many devices are still at risk.

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Pale Moon resolves rendering performance issues, among other tweaks and fixes

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Moonchild Productions has released a minor update to its Firefox browser variant for Windows with the release of Pale Moon 24.7 and Pale Moon x64 24.7.

Version 24.7 is primarily a bug fix release, and also includes the latest security fixes recently incorporated into the main Firefox build.

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Post Target many retailers continue to leave data at risk

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More than six months on from the Target breach hitting the headlines retailers are still not properly protecting their data according to risk management specialist BitSight.

Writing on the company's blog CTO and co-founder Stephen Boyer says, "BitSight has continued to observe evidence of system compromise inside hundreds of retailers over the course of the year. Based on our data and analysis, we observed that there were many retailers with poor performance and that this downward trend has continued into the second half of 2014".

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Better use of data can avoid the impact of a bad sales experience

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We've all had bad sales experiences at some time or another and they inevitably have a negative impact on our view on the company concerned.

A new study by mobile sales enablement specialist Showpad reveals that it can take years to recover from the damage caused to the customer relationship by a bad sales experience.

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No BYOD policy? Now is the time to prioritize user-oriented IT

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Halfway through 2014 and the use of personal devices in the workplace is very much common practice across most workforces in the US and UK. However, whilst many people are still talking about the effect the "bring your own device" policies (BYOD) are having on staff productivity, the cost-saving discussions have remained on the side-lines.

According to recent research, having the latest consumer device to use in the boardroom or replacing a notepad for a tablet is proving to be so popular with employees that 39 percent not only purchase their own device for work purposes but also spend more of their own money on devices than on tea and coffee.

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InPowered helps marketers use the power of expert opinion

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Independent reviews and opinions are a valuable commodity for marketers as they can often be key to purchasing decisions. Now content management specialist InPowered is launching a new product to help companies find out what experts are saying about them.

Called Expert Ranking it identifies the top experts on any topic and allows brands to discover what these experts are writing about them. It then lets the brand promote those opinions via their web, social and mobile channels.

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Session Manager automatically saves and restores your Firefox windows

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Get engrossed in your latest web research project and you’ll soon be navigating an array of browser tabs, each one with some vital piece of information -- it’s very easy to lose track.

Firefox offers a few very basic options to help you maintain control. Clicking History > Restore Previous Session will reopen whatever you were viewing last time, for instance, or you can bookmark all open tabs for reference later.

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Microsoft offers affordable Nokia Lumia 635 and Fitbit Flex bundle

Nokia Lumia 635 Fitbit Flex

Now that Windows Phone 8.1 has scored a huge win by receiving support for Fitbit wearables, Microsoft is giving prospective Nokia Lumia 635 buyers the option to purchase a bundle that also includes a Fitbit Flex activity tracker.

The bundle, that starts at $148.95, is good for both the AT&T and T-Mobile versions of Lumia 635, that cost $99 and $129, respectively, on Microsoft Store when purchased individually. Flex goes for $99.95 alone on Fitbit's site. That equates to savings of $50 when buying the two devices as a bundle on Microsoft's online and brick and mortar shops.

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Dating site OkCupid freely admits lying to its customers

Dating site OkCupid freely admits lying to its customers

There was widespread condemnation of Facebook when it was revealed that the social network had been manipulating users' newsfeeds as part of a social experiment. Official complaints may have been made but it doesn’t seem to have served as a lesson for other websites. Now it transpires that OkCupid -- the dating website whose slogan is "We use math to get you dates" -- has been fiddling the figures in a series of experiments on its users. The weird thing is, the site is openly bragging about it.

In a blog post unashamedly titled "We Experiment On Human Beings!", founder Christian Rudder writes that "OkCupid doesn’t really know what it’s doing". Seems like something of an odd admission. The blog post details three experiments the dating site conducted on its subscribers. There must have been more because the post is prefaced with the words "Here are a few of the more interesting experiments OkCupid has run". Does "interesting" just mean "less controversial"? Who knows?

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Apple launches faster MacBook Pro with Retina display lineup

Apple MacBook Pro 15 OS X 10.9 Mavericks

Apple has updated its MacBook Pro with Retina display lineup with faster processors across the board and more RAM in the base 13.3-inch and 15.4-inch models, that kick off at $1,299 and $1,999, respectively. The new processors are 200 MHz faster than before.

Both the entry-level and mid-range 13.3-inch Retina MacBook Pros come with a 2.6 GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor (with Turbo Boost up to 3.1 GHz), while the high-end model packs an even faster 2.8 GHz processor (with Turbo Boost up to 3.3 GHz). The base model gains 8 GB of RAM in the new generation, twice as much as its predecessor offered, but retains its 128 GB of internal storage.

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