Articles about Apple

Apple to store iCloud keys in China, sparking privacy fears

Chinese flag on Apple store

There are only days until Apple begins storing the data of Chinese iCloud users within China, and concern is mounting about the human rights and privacy implications.

A new data center is due to open in China at the end of this month as Apple moves to comply with Chinese authorities. It means that iCloud data such as text messages, photos and emails will be stored in China -- as will the cryptographic keys required to access the data. These keys had previously been stored in the US.

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Welcoming PWAs: Apple now supports service workers on Safari

Apple logo on MacBook

With Safari 11.1, Apple will introduce service workers to both macOS and iOS. Service workers are a crucial ingredient for Progressive Web Apps and will, therefore, bring a host of new capabilities and features to developers and Apple fans.

Google has been a big supporter for quite some time, but until recently, it looked like Apple was not on board. It seemed Apple would use it to draw a line in the sand between how it was going to do things and how Google wanted things to go. Apple introducing service workers to their OS platforms is beneficial to everyone, from business owners and developers to everyday app users.

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iPhone beaten in performance race by 1970's Apple II and other even older computers (and a mechanical calculator)

It’s a fact that today’s mobile phones boast way more computing power than the systems used by NASA to put a man on the moon in the 1960s.

The iPhone 6, released in 2014, is 32,600 times quicker than the speediest Apollo-era computers and capable of performing instructions a whopping 120,000,000 times faster. So in a race against seven computers from the past 75 years, you’d imagine the iPhone 6 would wipe the floor with an Apple II from 1977, a 1990s PC running Windows 98, and a £12.99 BBC Micro:Bit, right? Wrong.

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Twitter kills its Mac app, and that's a good thing

In 2016, I bought my very first Mac -- a beautiful MacBook Pro with Touch Bar. Since then, the laptop and I have been inseparable. The computer comes with me when I go to, say, a coffee shop, but it also serves as my desktop when I am home by connecting to a large monitor, keyboard, and mouse. In other words, I love the computer, but also, I really admire macOS.

When I first began using the Mac, I downloaded a bunch of software I thought I would enjoy. As a big Twitter user, I obviously installed the official app for that social network. You know what? It sucked. I tried to make it work, but ultimately, using a web browser was just a much better experience. On any desktop operating system, users are wise to use a browser. Let's be honest -- Twitter apps are best saved for smartphones and tablets. Twitter the company apparently agrees, as today, it officially kills the Mac app.

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Apple says it is totally normal for HomePod to ruin your furniture

As someone that typically loves Apple products, I was initially interested in HomePod. After all, it is gorgeous and designed for use with Apple Music -- my choice for a streaming music service. Once common sense set in, however, I realized it was not something I wanted. Why? Well, the $350 asking price is just too high compared to competitors. I'd actually be willing to pay a premium for a quality product, but Siri just cant compare to Alexa at this time. And so, I passed on HomePod.

And thank God that I did. You see, there have been reports from people that HomePod was ruining wood furniture. Consumers were claiming that both the white and grey versions of the cylindrical speaker were leaving white rings on some wood surfaces. Sadly, this was not a hoax or rumor, as Apple has now acknowledged it is aware of the "problem." The company will be issuing a recall, right? Oh no -- that would make too much sense. Instead, Apple hilariously states this is totally normal ("not unusual")!

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Apple videos show how to get the most from its HomePod speaker

Apple HomePod touch controls

The launch of the Apple HomePod was delayed last year, but the iPhone-maker's smart speaker was finally released a couple of days ago. Reviews are -- generally speaking -- positive, but early adopters have a few quibbles.

Whether you're thinking about jumping on the bandwagon, you already have a HomePod, or you just want to know more about them, Apple has released a series of videos that serve as a handy combination of tutorials and an introduction to its latest hardware.

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Apple HomePod: 'wow' but 'uh-oh'

HomePod arrived yesterday at 9:40 a.m. PST; thank-you UPS for prompt delivery of my preorder. My initial reaction: Wow and uh-oh. The wow harkens back to the original iPod, which Apple released in October 2001. The company's design ethic treated the overall experience as the user interface: Attach FireWire cable to Mac and device, music syncs. iTunes manages music on the Mac; for iPod, a simple scroll-wheel navigates tracks displayed on a small screen. The uncomplicated and understated approach defied the UX of every other MP3 sold by all other manufacturers.

HomePod is a defining, roots-return that's well-deserving of the portion of name in common with its forebear; both share in common emphasis on music listening as primary benefit.

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Apple confirms but downplays iOS source code leak

Silver iPhone 8 on box

Apple may have just released iOS 11.3 beta 2, but the attention of world turned to the iOS source code that leaked to GitHub. The iPhone maker has confirmed that code for iOS 9's iBoot had leaked, but stressed its age.

The company said that the leak does not pose a security threat to users, insisting that "the security of our products doesn't depend on the secrecy of our source code." But while Apple tries to play down the leak, there's no denying that it is highly significant and an unprecedented embarrassment.

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Apple issues takedown notice after iBoot source code leaks to GitHub

Silver iPhone 8 on box

The source code for the iOS bootloader iBoot has been leaked to GitHub, prompting Apple to issue a DMCA takedown notice.

Although the source code is for iOS 9.3 and a couple of years old, it appears to be the real deal and would still cause something of a headache for Apple. Copies of the code have been circulating online despite the takedown notice, and the concern is that it could be used to exploit iOS with malware.

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Cortana comes to iPad with faster loading than iPhone version

Cortana for iPad

After something of a delay -- two years, no less -- Microsoft has finally ported Cortana from the iPhone to the iPad.

The company has not made a great deal of noise about the updated app, but its digital assistant has now been optimized for use on Apple devices with larger screens. The restrictions of iOS still mean that Cortana cannot compete directly with Siri, as it is only possible to access the assistant's tools once it has been launched.

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iPhone X bug leaves some users unable to answer calls

iPhone X on a black background

A number of iPhone X users are complaining about a bug that leaves them unable to answer incoming calls. Reports of the bug are spreading through Apple's support forums, and the company is looking into the problem.

People who are experiencing the bug say that when they receive a call, their iPhone X rings, but the screen does not wake up. While the problem has been around for a couple of months, complaints seem to be growing in number at the moment.

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Apple launches free repair program for 'No Service' iPhone 7 bug

iPhone 7 Rose Gold

Apple has launched a new repair program aimed at iPhone 7 users who are experiencing a "No Service" problem. Apple says that affected models that were sold since September 2016 will be repaired free of charge.

The company explains that the No Service bug only affects a "small number" of handsets, and it is caused by a failed component on the main logic board. So which handsets are covered, and how do you go about claiming your free repair?

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iPhone X is a best-selling smartphone

iPhone X with unicorn animoji

The iPhone X was among the best-selling smartphones in major markets like Europe, Japan and US in December, according to a new report from Kantar Worldpanel ComTech. Apple's flagship helped iOS gain market share in five major European markets.

Kantar Worldpanel ComTech's report comes just after Nikkei claimed that iPhone X was selling bellow expectations. Nikkei based its analysis on supply figures from Apple's partners, which may not accurately reflect consumers' interest in the flagship.

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Virgin Mobile to offer cheap, 'pre-loved' iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus handsets

Virgin logo

Virgin Mobile has announced plans to offer Certified Pre-Loved iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus handsets in the US. Starting in February, the company will be offering the phones for between $379.99 and $429.99.

It is already possible to buy a Certified Pre-Loved iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus from Virgin Mobile, and by adding the newer handsets to the program, the company is offering a cheaper way to buy a more recent iPhone.

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iPhone X sales reportedly below expectations

iphone-x-launch-tokyo

Smartphone buyers are not all that impressed with the iPhone X. According to a new report released by Nikkei, Apple saw "slower-than-expected" sales in major markets like US, Europe and China during the holiday season.

Nikkei claims that, as a result, Apple has decided to halve the production target for its flagship smartphone in the first quarter of 2018 from 40 million units to 20 million units.

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